Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Showcase


Channel Catalog


Channel Description:

Tehran Times - Iran's Leading International Daily

older | 1 | .... | 158 | 159 | (Page 160) | 161 | 162 | .... | 174 | newer

    0 0

    TEHRAN – Iran on Sunday officially inaugurated its domestically designed search engine, dubbed yooz, which officials say can surf and search through a billion Persian web pages.
     
    The Yooz search engine, available on Yooz.ir, was inaugurated in a ceremony attended by Communication and Information Technology Minister Mahmoud Vaezi in Tehran.
     
    Iran currently holds the sixth place in the world in terms of using the Google search engine, according to Mehdi Naqavi, the Yooz project manager, standing above countries such as Germany, Italy, France and even China.
     
    Naqavi added that the Google search engine has now turned into the “spine of the internet usage” in Iran, despite the fact that, under a 2007 PRISM Project, computer giants such as Google, Facebook, and Microsoft provide the U.S. intelligence apparatus with the information pertaining to their users.
     
    Addressing the inauguration ceremony, Vaezi also announced plans to launch yet another Iranian search engine, Parsijoo, in the spring.
     
    He said his ministry plans to develop competition among local search engines.
     
    He also stated that the ministry does not seek to compete with Google, and that it does not plan to restrict users’ access to the giant search engine.  
     
    MD/PA
     

    0 0
  • 02/15/15--11:02: Art news in brief
  • Persian poet Hushang Ebtehaj hospitalized due to pneumonia 
    TEHRAN - Celebrated Persian poet Hushang Ebtehaj, known by the pseudonym of H. E. Sayeh, has been admitted to a hospital in Cologne, Germany due to pneumonia.
     
    Speaking to Iran’s Students News Agency, his wife expressed hope that Ebtehaj will recover in few days. 
     
    His works were sources of inspiration for many Iranian vocalists, including Mohammadreza Shajarian, Shahram Nazeri and Hossein Qavami.
     
    “The History of Rock Roll” published in Persian 
    TEHRAN – A Persian translation of U.S. author Adam Woog’s “The History of Rock Roll”, a chronological overview of the history of rock and roll music, has been recently published in Iran.
     
    The book also covers the societal impact of rock and roll during its golden age. 
     
    Qoqnoos is the publisher of the book, which was translated into Persian by Arash Azizi.
     
    MA/YAW
    END
     

    0 0

    TEHRAN – Eleven Iranian films are screening at the 21st Vesoul International Festival of Asian Cinema, which is currently underway in eastern France. 
     
    Nima Javidi’s acclaimed drama “Melbourne” is the sole Iranian film competing with eight other movies from across the world in the main section of the festival.  
     
    The film won accolades at several international events including the 52nd Gijón International Film Festival in Spain and the 29th Mar del Plata International Film Festival in Argentina.  
     
    “Melbourne” tells the story of a young couple, Amir and Sara, who plan to leave their homeland seeking a new life in the Australian coastal city of Melbourne. However, a tragic event puts their plan at risk.
     
    The Iranian lineup also includes “Goodbye” and “Manuscripts Don’t Burn”, both directed by Mohammad Rasulof, and “A Respected Family” directed by Masud Bakhshi, which are screening in the Breathless section. 
     
    Rasulof also is a member of the festival’s international jury, which is led by Chinese director Wang Chao.
     
    The organizers of the festival also selected six films for Focus Iranian Independents, a section that is exclusively for screening films from indie movies from Iran.
     
    The films are “Please Don’t Disturb” by Mohsen Abdolvahab, “Rainy Seasons” by Majid Barzegar, “The Last Step” by Ali Mosaffa, “The Wedlock” by Ruhollah Hejazi, “The Sale” by Hossein Shahabi, and “I Am Not Angry” by Reza Dormishian.
     
    “Iranian Ninja” directed by Marjan Riahi is competing in the documentary section.
     
    The documentary chronicles the struggles of Khatereh Jalilzadeh in Tehran who teaches young girls how to twirl nunchucks and launch dropkicks.
     
    Ninety films are competing in various section of the Vesoul festival, one of the oldest and most popular events in Europe, which comes to an end on Tuesday.
     
    MA/YAW
    END

    0 0

    TEHRAN -- ”Taxi” starring and directed by Jafar Panahi won the Golden Bear for best film on Saturday at the Berlin International Film Festival, organizers announced on Saturday.
     
    The award, which the director was not in Berlin to accept, was handed to his niece, Hana Saeidi, who herself also appears in the movie.
     
    “Taxi” is a documentary-like drama set entirely in a taxi where Panahi as the cabdriver talks to some of his passengers as he navigates the streets of Tehran.
     
    “The Club” by Chilean director Pablo Larrain, about defrocked Roman Catholic priests, won the Silver Bear Grand Jury Prize.
     
    “Ixcanul” (“Volcano”), a film by Guatemalan director Jayro Bustamente about the hard life of Mayan coffee growers, won the Silver Bear Alfred Bauer Prize.
     
    The best actor and best actress awards went to Tom Courtenay and Charlotte Rampling, who play a couple in British director Andrew Haigh’s drama “45 Years”.
     
    RM/YAW
    END
     

    0 0

    TEHRAN -- Austria-based German clarinet virtuoso Ulrich Drechsler says he has enjoyed Iranian cuisine during his stay in Iran.
     
    “I am addicted to food. When I came to Iran and a friend took me to a restaurant in northern district of Tehran and had kebab with a taste of saffron, I was in high spirits,” Ulrich Drechsler told the Persian service of ISNA on Sunday.
     
    “Pomegranate juice and saffron ice cream, these are incredible and awesome. You make use of a variety of spice and vegetables in your food. I think I would own a restaurant in Iran if I could come back to this world once again,’ he exclaimed. 
     
    Ulrich Drechsler is in Iran attending the 30th Fajr International Music Festival. 
     
    He continued that this is his second trip to Iran and hoped to return again in spring or summer.
     
    “I have only stayed in Tehran during these days and have got to know only a little part of your culture. My friends have shown beautiful places like the Music Museum of Iran, and I was surprised to see such numbers of Iranian musical instruments,” he stated.
     
    “I must say that the main thing in my life is my family, then food and after that music. I have fallen in love with Iranian life and the Iranian mentality,” he stated.
     
    The musician also asserted that he is in love with Oriental music and that he is a fan of Iranian kamancheh virtuoso Kayhan Kalhor and he hopes to attend one of his concerts someday.
     
    Ulrich Drechsler and Italian jazz pianist Stefano Battaglia have given two performances at the festival, which will come to an end on February 20.
     
    The Iranian audience was highly entertained by a series of lullabies that Ulrich Drechsler performed at his concerts during the festival.
     
    RM/YAW
    END
     
     

    0 0

    TEHRAN -- A news story about the release of an album allegedly containing solo performances by a female singer, something that is forbidden in Iran, has gotten the Ministry of Culture and Islamic Guidance into trouble.
     
    A number of top Iranian Muslim clerics and some MPs voiced exasperation in early February with the Culture Ministry’s decision to authorize the album entitled “Love You, O Ancient Land”. 
     
    The criticism from the clerics and MPs was based on reports from certain Persian news websites, which claimed that “Love You, O Ancient Land” was a solo album by a female singer Noshin Tafi.
     
    However, all tracks of the album were performed by a choir of Tafi and a male singer, Mohsen Keramati. 
     
    In Iran, female singers are only allowed to perform for an audience of females and in choral performances with male singers in public. 
     
    “The complaints from the respected clerics are based on false reports that they have received about the album,” Culture Minister Ali Jannati said last week.
     
    “Of course, I respect them and understand their concerns, which come from religious motivations,” he added.
     
    “I emphatically deny all reports claiming that the Culture Ministry has authorized an album that contains solo performances by a female singer,” Jannati stated.
     
    He asked Iranian news websites to avoid spreading false news reports.
     
    MMS/YAW
    END
     

    0 0
  • 02/16/15--12:17: Art news in brief
  • Iranian films to compete in Cinequest Film Festival 
    TEHRAN – The Iranian films “Snow” and “Sormeh” will compete in the 25th Cinequest Film Festival, which is scheduled to be held in the U.S. city of San Jose from February 24 to March 8.
     
    Directed by Mehdi Rahmani, “Snow” will be screened in the main competition and “Sormeh” directed by Azadeh Qochaq will be shown in the short film section.
     
    The festival presents 200 films with over 700 participating artists and innovators from 50 countries in attendance. 
     
     
    Intl. Storytelling Festival opens in Kermanshah 
    TEHRAN - The 16th International Storytelling Festival opened in the western Iranian city of Kermanshah on Monday.
     
    Twelve storytellers from Colombia, Australia, the U.S., Canada, Scotland, the Philippines, Kenya, Brazil, Armenia, Lebanon, Syria and Morocco are participating in this event. 
     
    In addition, over 50 Iranian storytellers are competing in the festival, has been organized by the Institute for the Intellectual Development of Children and Young Adults.
     
     
    Theatergoers enjoying “A Night Out” in Tehran 
    TEHRAN – An Iranian troupe is performing English playwright Harold Pinter’s “A Night Out” at Tehran’s Mashayekhi Theater.  
     
    The play, which is jointly being directed by Farid Qaderpanah and Ramin Masumian, will run until March 19.
     
    “A Night Out” mainly accentuates U.S. social life in the 1960s.
     
    It was considered the first big success of the Nobel laureate as a dramatist. He was also a screenwriter and a director.
     
    MA/YAW
    END

    0 0

    TEHRAN – Iranian stage director Behruz Gharibpur and architect Mohammad-Mansur Falamaki have each received the order of Stella d’Italia (Star of Italy) for their lifetime achievements.
     
    Italian Ambassador Mauro Conciatori presented the medals during a ceremony held at the Embassy of Italy in to Tehran on last Thursday, some Persian news websites announced on Sunday.
     
    “My cultural activities and stage performances in Italy were said to be the reasons for the honor,” Gharibpur, who is mostly known for his puppet shows, told the Persian service of MNA on Monday.
     
    He added that his puppet shows “Rustam and Sohrab”, “Macbeth”, and “Ashura” have been staged in Rome and Turin and were warmly received by the people of those Italian cities.
     
    Mohammad-Mansur Falamaki is a prominent architectural advocate promoting true Iranian architecture. He has a Ph.D. in architecture from the University of Venice.
     
    He is the founder of the Falamaki’s Institute of Architecture – FAZA.
     
    Falamaki has been teaching at the University of Tehran for years and was selected Iran’s Eternal Figure in architecture in 2010.
     
    RM/YAW
    END
     

    0 0

    TEHRAN -- The southwestern Iranian city of Ahvaz in Khuzestan Province will be hosting the 1st Ahvaz International Science Photo Festival, which will open at the Ahvaz Museum of Contemporary Art next week.
     
    The festival will be held on astronomy and five other categories, the artistic director of the festival, Ahmad Neshan, told the Persian service of ISNA on Monday.
     
    “Photos by celebrated filmmakers including Abbas Kiarostami and Nasser Taqvaii, and actor Reza Kianian and graphic designer Ebrahim Haqiqi will go on display in the festival’s special art section,” Neshan added.
     
    A collection of 10 rare photos loaned by the Tehran Museum of Contemporary Art will be put on show in this section, he remarked.
     
    A special section has also been dedicated to photos on the 1980-1988 Iran-Iraq war known as Sacred Defense in Iran. 
     
    In addition, Hungarian wildlife photographer Bence Mate will be attending the festival with five photos, he said.
     
    He added that Professor Jolanda Capriglione from Italy’s Second University of Naples has been invited as a guest of honor to the program which will run from February 22 to March 3.
     
    The festival has been organized by the Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz in collaboration with the Center for Visual Arts of the Ministry of Culture and Islamic Guidance, and the Tehran Museum of Contemporary Art.
     
    RM/YAW
    END
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     

    0 0

    TEHRAN -- Iranian filmmakers Abbas Kiarostami and Asghar Farhadi and cinematographer Mahmud Kalari will hold master classes during the 52nd Arvand Regional Short Film Festival, the organizers announced on Sunday.
     
    The festival, which is organized annually by the Iranian Young Cinema Society, will be held in the Arvand Free Zone of the southwestern Iranian province of Khuzestan from February 20 to 23.
     
    Kalari will hold a master class on cinematography on the opening day of the event on February 20. A collection of his photographs will be showcased in an exhibition on the sidelines of the festival.  
     
    Kiarostami will discuss making short films in his class, which is scheduled to be held on February 21. Two of his latest short films will also be screened during the festival.
     
    Farhadi will deliver a lecture about screenwriting on February 22.
     
    Over 70 short films, documentaries and animations will be screened during the festival.
     
    MMS/YAW
    END
     

    0 0

    TEHRAN – Parviz Parastuii won the best actor award at the Jaipur International Film Festival in India.
     
    He was honored for his roles in “Today” and “We Have a Guest”, the organizers announced on Monday.
     
    In a statement published by the Persian service of ISNA on Monday, Parastuii dedicated his award to five veteran Iranian actors: Ezzatollah Entezami, Mohammad-Ali Keshavarz, Jamshid Mashayekhi, Ali Nasirian and Davud Rashidi.
     
    Directed by Reza Mirkarimi, “Today” narrates the story of a Tehran taxi driver who becomes the protector of a pregnant woman after he rushes her to a hospital. 
     
    “We Have a Guest” directed by Mohammad-mehdi Asgarpur tells the story of a couple, three of whose children were martyred during the 1980-1988 Iran-Iraq war.
     
    Sohana Saba from Bangladesh also received the best actress award for “Brihonnola”.
     
    The best film award was presented to Indian director Aditya Vikram Sengupta’s “Asha Jaoar Maihe”, and the best director award went to Tehran-based Afghan filmmaker Jamshid Mahmudi for “A Few Cubic Meters of Love”, which was shot in Iran.
     
    MA/YAW
    END
     

    0 0


    In association with the “rebirth of nature”, extensive spring-cleaning is a national tradition observed by almost every household in Iran. 
     
    Several Iranian families are now busy preparing their homes for Noruz, the Iranian New Year celebration, in advance. 
     
    In Persian, the annual spring cleaning is called khaneh-tekani, which literally means “shaking the house”. 
     
    It is a spring clean which sees otherwise drab exteriors of houses given life by the colors and intricate patterns of carpets being suspended for a good airing from roofs, windows and balconies throughout the land. 
     
    The Persian New Year of Noruz falls on the first day of spring, between March 19 and March 22. 
     
    During the khaneh-tekani, all members of the home help and cooperate in thoroughly cleaning every nook and cranny of the home. 
     
    They also fill their homes with fresh flowers, usually hyacinth and narcissus, and burn incense made from the esfand plant.
     
    Families meticulously wash rugs, windows, curtains and repair furniture. They throw out or donate old household goods and purchase new clothing to greet the coming spring.
     
    Debris from the past is removed from within the home and detritus from the outside. Carpets and curtains are washed, silverware polished, and windows cleaned. 
     
    After the cleaning, Iranians buy fragrant plants such as hyacinths and tube roses to freshen the air. 
     
    Some Iranians burn and use wild rue, esfand, after the spring cleaning. They believe that the aromatic fumes help ward off evil spirits while welcoming the spirits of the departed. 
     
    Khaneh-tekani: A symbol of cycle of nature
    After spring cleaning, the home is ready for a fresh start to the New Year. The home is also ready to receive guests during the customary Noruz visitations.
     
    The ill fortune and evil spirits of the old year are washed away along with the dust and grime in preparation for the New Year.
     
    In short, this is the time of year when the slate is wiped clean, with a fresh start to the year symbolizing the natural cycle so important in sustaining life.
     
    The homes are prepared for the year in which, all are willing to live with more energy and motivation to continue. 
     
    Symbolically, khaneh-tekani signals to the spirits of the ancestors that their kin are ready and willing to entertain them. 
     
    This is also extended to personal attire, and it is customary to buy at least one set of new clothes. 
     
    On the New Year’s Day, families dress in their new clothes and start the twelve-day celebrations by visiting the elders of their family, then the rest of their family and finally their friends. 
     
    On the thirteenth day families leave their homes and picnic outdoors, as part of the Sizdah Be-dar ceremony.

    0 0


    Ye Ghol Do Ghol is an Iranian traditional play. Five little stones with round shapes are needed for the game, which is played by two people or more.
     
    The play is also known as Panj Panj, Besh Dash and Rag-Rag Bazi. Children play the game by turn and the rest observe and evaluate the player.
     
    With throwing five stones in the air at the same time, the player should control the flying stones to drop at the back of his/her hand. 
     
    Then, throwing them again in the air at the same time, he/she should be able to catch them, with the same hand (that has played). 
     
    The game is started with yek ghol (one stone) and reaches five ghol (five stones). If no one has a foul, the game is repeated and after each turn, the scores will be added to the previous amount. 
     
    In the beginning or the game, five stones will be thrown on the ground while the players sit in a circle. 
     
    The player, choosing one stone, throw it up in the air and in the interval of its falling down, he or she must take another stone and this is repeated until all the stones are collected.
     
    The play continues and in each stage, the player chooses one stone and whilst throwing it in the air, he or she has to pick up one more stone in comparison to the previous stage and then catch the stone that has been throw up.
     
    In the end, the player, by throwing five stones in the air at the same time, must at first control as many of them as possible on the back of his/her hand and then by throwing all of them in the air, the player should catch all of them by the same hand. 
     
    For some people each stone represents an opportunity which, if one is not careful, will pass by.
     

    0 0

    TEHRAN -- Cosmic Heart Gallery in the Indian city of Mumbai is playing host to an exhibition of Persian artworks.
     
    Entitled “Building Bridges of Love”, the exhibition showcases a variety of artworks including Persian handicrafts, inlaid works, enamel works and Persian calligraphy, the gallery has announced on its website.
     
    A collection of art prints by master miniaturist Mahmud Farshchian has also been put on display in the exhibit.
     
    In addition, an exhibition of photos of the beautiful landscapes of Iran taken by Indian Salman Chishty during his journey to Iran is also on show on the sidelines of the exhibit.
     
    The Chishty Foundation is an organization aiming to promote the blessed Sufi teachings of Khawaja Gharib Nawaz (1141-1236), the most famous saint of the Chishti Order of Sufism in India.
     
    The exhibit has been organized by the Culture House of Iran in Mumbai in collaboration with the Chishty Foundation and will run until March 26.
     
    RM/YAW
    END
     
     
     

    0 0

    TEHRAN – Hassan Ebrahim Habibi (1937 – 2013), the first director of the Academy of Persian Language and Literature was commemorated during a ceremony held at the Iranian Society of Cultural Works and Luminaries on Monday.
     
    Minister of Culture and Islamic Guidance Ali Jannati, the current director of the academy Gholam-Ali Haddad-Adel, and the director of the society Mehdi Mohaqeq were among the participants, the Persian service of ILNA reported on Tuesday.
     
    Habibi had a Ph.D. in law and sociology, and also served as Iran’s first vice president from 1989 to 2001.
     
    In a brief speech, Jannati called Habibi a man who believed in serious works and did not agree to do simple and easy works.
     
    Haddad-Adel said that Habibi was in love with the Persian language and literature.
     
    “He had a good command of Arabic and knew how to make good use of literary works. His translations were accurate and precise. He used to compose poetry and liked the poems on Persian language and Iran,” Haddad-Adel explained.
     
    Habibi was the founder of the Iranology Foundation and chose a design that helps introduce Iranian and Islamic architecture, Haddad-Adel added.
     
    “He also dedicated all the gifts and awards he had collected over 34 years of work to the foundation,” he concluded.
     
    The program was organized by the Iranian Society of Cultural Works and Luminaries.
     
    RM/YAW
    END

    0 0
  • 02/17/15--12:01: Art news in brief
  • Tehran exhibit to raise funds for parentless children
    TEHRAN - A painting exhibition will open at in the courtyard of Tehran’s Milad Tower today to raise funds for parentless children.
     
    The exhibition has been organized by Dastha-ye Mehraban Charity Foundation, which provides supports for parentless children and female victims of abuse.  
     
    Seventy works created by the children who are under the protection of the foundation will be showcased at the exhibition that will run until February 20.   
     
    “Juliet Dove, Queen of Love” comes to Iranian bookstores
    TEHRAN – A Persian translation of American children’s book writer Bruce Coville’s “Juliet Dove, Queen of Love” has recently been published by Afarinegan in Tehran.
     
    The book, rendered into Persian by Mahbubeh Najafkhani, tells the story of a middle school girl who gets lured into a shop and is given a magical and incredibly strong crystal amulet that takes her on a journey into a fairy tale.
     
    Coville is the author of a number of books, including modernized retellings of stories by William Shakespeare, and plays for children and young adults. 
     
    Iranian films to compete in French festival 
    TEHRAN – The Iranian films “Objects in Mirror” and “Iranian Ninja” will compete in the 37th Créteil International Women’s Film Festival, which is scheduled to be held in Paris from March 13 to 22.
     
    Directed by Narges Abyar, “Objects in Mirror” will be screened in the main competition section and “Iranian Ninja” directed by Marjan Riahi will be shown in the documentary section.
     
    Iranian writer Moradi Kermani visits New Delhi book fair
    TEHRAN – Iranian writer Hushang Moradi Kermani is currently in India to visit the 23rd New Delhi World Book Fair (NDWBF).
     
    He will promote his “The Water Urn”, translated into English by U.S. translator Caroline Croskery, at the book fair, which runs until February 22. 
     
    He is also scheduled to lecture on Persian literature at selected academic centers of the country.
     
    Iran mulls over Tajikistan, Oman apps for TIBF guest of honor 
    TEHRAN -- Deputy Minister of Culture and Islamic Guidance for Cultural Affairs Seyyed Abbas Salehi said that Iran is mulling over the candidacies of Tajikistan and Oman for being the guest of honor at the Tehran International Book Fair (TIBF).
     
    “Both countries have some special privileges and we are scrutinizing their programs for this event,” he stated during a press conference on Monday.
     
    The 28th edition of the TIBF is scheduled to be held during May. 
     
    Iran feels proud of “Muhammad (S)”: culture minister
    TEHRAN -- Minister of Culture and Islamic Guidance Ali Jannati said on Monday that “Muhammad (S), the Messenger of God”, Majid Majidi’s movie on the childhood of the Prophet of Islam, is “an eternal work” and “Iran feels proud of the film.”
     
    He made the remarks on Monday during a meeting with students and professors from several Iranian academic centers for art.
     
    He expressed his hope that film would have its world premiere in the near future.
     
    MA/MMS/YAW
    END

    0 0

    TEHRAN -- The Tehran Museum of Contemporary Art (TMCA) plans to hold a retrospective of German artist Otto Piene (1928–2014), one of the leading figures in technology-based art, TMCA Director Majid Mollanoruzi said on Tuesday.
     
    The exhibition, which has been organized with the help of Breckner Gallery in Düsseldorf, will open on February 24. 
     
    “Piene was one of the foreign enthusiasts of Iran, who drew inspiration from the colors of the tile works of the Imam Mosque in Isfahan to create one of his works,” he stated during a press conference at the TMCA.
     
    The tableau will be among about 100 works to be displayed at the exhibition. 
     
    Breckner Gallery is paying the insurance fee for those of Piene’s works that will be showcased at the exhibition, Mollanoruzi said.
     
    “Breckner Gallery began its collaboration with TMAC in 1997 when Alireza Sami-Azar was in charge of the museum and the gallery intends to continue its tie with TMCA and we welcome this connection,” he added.
     
    “German artists have always regarded the four classical elements and philosophy in their works,” he stated and expressed his hope that the exhibition would provide an opportunity for art critics to conduct a comparative study about philosophy and art in the West and East.
     
    German Ambassador Michael Freiherr von Ungern-Sternberg and Breckner Gallery director Till Breckner also attend the press conference.
     
    Von Ungern-Sternberg called the exhibition an international event due the fact that all Piene’s works, which will put on display at the exhibition, have been loaned by private collectors and galleries in Germany, Switzerland, the U.S. and several other countries.
     
    Till Breckner spoke of Piene’s childhood when he had to spend all night without any light in order to protect himself from the bombardments during World War II.
     
    Light turned into a symbol of peace and life for him after the war came to an end, he added.
     
    Piene studied art in Munich and Dusseldorf, as well as taking a degree in philosophy at Cologne University.
     
    He founded the influential European postwar movement Group Zero with Heinz Mack in 1957, as part of an effort to transform and redefine art in the aftermath of the Second World War.
     
    His most famous work was the 1600ft Rainbow that lit up the Munich sky at the end of the 1972 Olympics.
     
    MMS/YAW
    END
     

    0 0


    In association with the “rebirth of nature”, extensive spring-cleaning is a national tradition observed by almost every household in Iran. 
     
    Several Iranian families are now busy preparing their homes for Noruz, the Iranian New Year celebration, in advance. 
     
    In Persian, the annual spring cleaning is called khaneh-tekani, which literally means “shaking the house”. 
     
    It is a spring clean which sees otherwise drab exteriors of houses given life by the colors and intricate patterns of carpets being suspended for a good airing from roofs, windows and balconies throughout the land. 
     
    The Persian New Year of Noruz falls on the first day of spring, between March 19 and March 22. 
     
    During the khaneh-tekani, all members of the home help and cooperate in thoroughly cleaning every nook and cranny of the home. 
     
    They also fill their homes with fresh flowers, usually hyacinth and narcissus, and burn incense made from the esfand plant.
     
    Families meticulously wash rugs, windows, curtains and repair furniture. They throw out or donate old household goods and purchase new clothing to greet the coming spring.
     
    Debris from the past is removed from within the home and detritus from the outside. Carpets and curtains are washed, silverware polished, and windows cleaned. 
     
    After the cleaning, Iranians buy fragrant plants such as hyacinths and tube roses to freshen the air. 
     
    Some Iranians burn and use wild rue, esfand, after the spring cleaning. They believe that the aromatic fumes help ward off evil spirits while welcoming the spirits of the departed. 
     
    Khaneh-tekani: A symbol of cycle of nature
    After spring cleaning, the home is ready for a fresh start to the New Year. The home is also ready to receive guests during the customary Noruz visitations.
     
    The ill fortune and evil spirits of the old year are washed away along with the dust and grime in preparation for the New Year.
     
    In short, this is the time of year when the slate is wiped clean, with a fresh start to the year symbolizing the natural cycle so important in sustaining life.
     
    The homes are prepared for the year in which, all are willing to live with more energy and motivation to continue. 
     
    Symbolically, khaneh-tekani signals to the spirits of the ancestors that their kin are ready and willing to entertain them. 
     
    This is also extended to personal attire, and it is customary to buy at least one set of new clothes. 
     
    On the New Year’s Day, families dress in their new clothes and start the twelve-day celebrations by visiting the elders of their family, then the rest of their family and finally their friends. 
     
    On the thirteenth day families leave their homes and picnic outdoors, as part of the Sizdah Be-dar ceremony.

    0 0


    Ye Ghol Do Ghol is an Iranian traditional play. Five little stones with round shapes are needed for the game, which is played by two people or more.
     
    The play is also known as Panj Panj, Besh Dash and Rag-Rag Bazi. Children play the game by turn and the rest observe and evaluate the player.
     
    With throwing five stones in the air at the same time, the player should control the flying stones to drop at the back of his/her hand. 
     
    Then, throwing them again in the air at the same time, he/she should be able to catch them, with the same hand (that has played). 
     
    The game is started with yek ghol (one stone) and reaches five ghol (five stones). If no one has a foul, the game is repeated and after each turn, the scores will be added to the previous amount. 
     
    In the beginning or the game, five stones will be thrown on the ground while the players sit in a circle. 
     
    The player, choosing one stone, throw it up in the air and in the interval of its falling down, he or she must take another stone and this is repeated until all the stones are collected.
     
    The play continues and in each stage, the player chooses one stone and whilst throwing it in the air, he or she has to pick up one more stone in comparison to the previous stage and then catch the stone that has been throw up.
     
    In the end, the player, by throwing five stones in the air at the same time, must at first control as many of them as possible on the back of his/her hand and then by throwing all of them in the air, the player should catch all of them by the same hand. 
     
    For some people each stone represents an opportunity which, if one is not careful, will pass by.
     

    0 0

    TEHRAN -- Cosmic Heart Gallery in the Indian city of Mumbai is playing host to an exhibition of Persian artworks.
     
    Entitled “Building Bridges of Love”, the exhibition showcases a variety of artworks including Persian handicrafts, inlaid works, enamel works and Persian calligraphy, the gallery has announced on its website.
     
    A collection of art prints by master miniaturist Mahmud Farshchian has also been put on display in the exhibit.
     
    In addition, an exhibition of photos of the beautiful landscapes of Iran taken by Indian Salman Chishty during his journey to Iran is also on show on the sidelines of the exhibit.
     
    The Chishty Foundation is an organization aiming to promote the blessed Sufi teachings of Khawaja Gharib Nawaz (1141-1236), the most famous saint of the Chishti Order of Sufism in India.
     
    The exhibit has been organized by the Culture House of Iran in Mumbai in collaboration with the Chishty Foundation and will run until March 26.
     
    RM/YAW
    END
     
     
     

older | 1 | .... | 158 | 159 | (Page 160) | 161 | 162 | .... | 174 | newer