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Tehran Times - Iran's Leading International Daily

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    TEHRAN – Hassan Ebrahim Habibi (1937 – 2013), the first director of the Academy of Persian Language and Literature was commemorated during a ceremony held at the Iranian Society of Cultural Works and Luminaries on Monday.
     
    Minister of Culture and Islamic Guidance Ali Jannati, the current director of the academy Gholam-Ali Haddad-Adel, and the director of the society Mehdi Mohaqeq were among the participants, the Persian service of ILNA reported on Tuesday.
     
    Habibi had a Ph.D. in law and sociology, and also served as Iran’s first vice president from 1989 to 2001.
     
    In a brief speech, Jannati called Habibi a man who believed in serious works and did not agree to do simple and easy works.
     
    Haddad-Adel said that Habibi was in love with the Persian language and literature.
     
    “He had a good command of Arabic and knew how to make good use of literary works. His translations were accurate and precise. He used to compose poetry and liked the poems on Persian language and Iran,” Haddad-Adel explained.
     
    Habibi was the founder of the Iranology Foundation and chose a design that helps introduce Iranian and Islamic architecture, Haddad-Adel added.
     
    “He also dedicated all the gifts and awards he had collected over 34 years of work to the foundation,” he concluded.
     
    The program was organized by the Iranian Society of Cultural Works and Luminaries.
     
    RM/YAW
    END

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  • 02/17/15--12:01: Art news in brief
  • Tehran exhibit to raise funds for parentless children
    TEHRAN - A painting exhibition will open at in the courtyard of Tehran’s Milad Tower today to raise funds for parentless children.
     
    The exhibition has been organized by Dastha-ye Mehraban Charity Foundation, which provides supports for parentless children and female victims of abuse.  
     
    Seventy works created by the children who are under the protection of the foundation will be showcased at the exhibition that will run until February 20.   
     
    “Juliet Dove, Queen of Love” comes to Iranian bookstores
    TEHRAN – A Persian translation of American children’s book writer Bruce Coville’s “Juliet Dove, Queen of Love” has recently been published by Afarinegan in Tehran.
     
    The book, rendered into Persian by Mahbubeh Najafkhani, tells the story of a middle school girl who gets lured into a shop and is given a magical and incredibly strong crystal amulet that takes her on a journey into a fairy tale.
     
    Coville is the author of a number of books, including modernized retellings of stories by William Shakespeare, and plays for children and young adults. 
     
    Iranian films to compete in French festival 
    TEHRAN – The Iranian films “Objects in Mirror” and “Iranian Ninja” will compete in the 37th Créteil International Women’s Film Festival, which is scheduled to be held in Paris from March 13 to 22.
     
    Directed by Narges Abyar, “Objects in Mirror” will be screened in the main competition section and “Iranian Ninja” directed by Marjan Riahi will be shown in the documentary section.
     
    Iranian writer Moradi Kermani visits New Delhi book fair
    TEHRAN – Iranian writer Hushang Moradi Kermani is currently in India to visit the 23rd New Delhi World Book Fair (NDWBF).
     
    He will promote his “The Water Urn”, translated into English by U.S. translator Caroline Croskery, at the book fair, which runs until February 22. 
     
    He is also scheduled to lecture on Persian literature at selected academic centers of the country.
     
    Iran mulls over Tajikistan, Oman apps for TIBF guest of honor 
    TEHRAN -- Deputy Minister of Culture and Islamic Guidance for Cultural Affairs Seyyed Abbas Salehi said that Iran is mulling over the candidacies of Tajikistan and Oman for being the guest of honor at the Tehran International Book Fair (TIBF).
     
    “Both countries have some special privileges and we are scrutinizing their programs for this event,” he stated during a press conference on Monday.
     
    The 28th edition of the TIBF is scheduled to be held during May. 
     
    Iran feels proud of “Muhammad (S)”: culture minister
    TEHRAN -- Minister of Culture and Islamic Guidance Ali Jannati said on Monday that “Muhammad (S), the Messenger of God”, Majid Majidi’s movie on the childhood of the Prophet of Islam, is “an eternal work” and “Iran feels proud of the film.”
     
    He made the remarks on Monday during a meeting with students and professors from several Iranian academic centers for art.
     
    He expressed his hope that film would have its world premiere in the near future.
     
    MA/MMS/YAW
    END

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    TEHRAN -- The Tehran Museum of Contemporary Art (TMCA) plans to hold a retrospective of German artist Otto Piene (1928–2014), one of the leading figures in technology-based art, TMCA Director Majid Mollanoruzi said on Tuesday.
     
    The exhibition, which has been organized with the help of Breckner Gallery in Düsseldorf, will open on February 24. 
     
    “Piene was one of the foreign enthusiasts of Iran, who drew inspiration from the colors of the tile works of the Imam Mosque in Isfahan to create one of his works,” he stated during a press conference at the TMCA.
     
    The tableau will be among about 100 works to be displayed at the exhibition. 
     
    Breckner Gallery is paying the insurance fee for those of Piene’s works that will be showcased at the exhibition, Mollanoruzi said.
     
    “Breckner Gallery began its collaboration with TMAC in 1997 when Alireza Sami-Azar was in charge of the museum and the gallery intends to continue its tie with TMCA and we welcome this connection,” he added.
     
    “German artists have always regarded the four classical elements and philosophy in their works,” he stated and expressed his hope that the exhibition would provide an opportunity for art critics to conduct a comparative study about philosophy and art in the West and East.
     
    German Ambassador Michael Freiherr von Ungern-Sternberg and Breckner Gallery director Till Breckner also attend the press conference.
     
    Von Ungern-Sternberg called the exhibition an international event due the fact that all Piene’s works, which will put on display at the exhibition, have been loaned by private collectors and galleries in Germany, Switzerland, the U.S. and several other countries.
     
    Till Breckner spoke of Piene’s childhood when he had to spend all night without any light in order to protect himself from the bombardments during World War II.
     
    Light turned into a symbol of peace and life for him after the war came to an end, he added.
     
    Piene studied art in Munich and Dusseldorf, as well as taking a degree in philosophy at Cologne University.
     
    He founded the influential European postwar movement Group Zero with Heinz Mack in 1957, as part of an effort to transform and redefine art in the aftermath of the Second World War.
     
    His most famous work was the 1600ft Rainbow that lit up the Munich sky at the end of the 1972 Olympics.
     
    MMS/YAW
    END
     

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    TEHRAN – A group of sixteen Iranian publishers is displaying their latest offerings at the 23rd New Delhi World Book Fair. 
     
    Sorush, Sureh-Mehr, Hirmand, Yasavoli, Peydayesh, Negah and Afraz are among the publishing companies, several Persian media announced on Wednesday.
     
    Among the highlights on display at the book fair are “Da” by Zahra Hosseini, “Chess with the Doomsday Machine” by Habib Ahmadzadeh, “Ancient Celebrations of Iran” by Hossein Azaran, “Persian Legends” by Mohammad Qasemzadeh and “Fereidun the Son of Faranak” by Alireza Mahmudi-Iranmehr.
     
    Also included are “I Turn Green” by Nasser Yusefi, “Legend of Darab” by Sorur Katbi and “Legend of Arash, the Archer” by Mohammadreza Yusefi.
     
    The book fair, which opened on February 14, will be running until February 22.
     
    Iranian writer Hushang Moradi Kermani is currently in India visiting the fair, where he will be promoting his “The Water Urn”, which was translated into English by U.S. translator Caroline Croskery.
     
    The collection of books will later go on show at the Muscat Book Fair, which will be held from February 25 to March 7.
     
    RM/YAW
    END

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    TEHRAN -- The Iraqi National Symphony Orchestra is scheduled to perform compositions by Iranian musician Loris Tjeknavorian during its concert at Tehran’s Vahdat Hall today.
     
    The orchestra has been invited by the organizers of the 30th Fajr International Music Festival, which is currently underway in the Iranian capital.
     
    The concert will be held in two parts, the first of which will be conducted by Iranian musician Arash Amini.
     
    The orchestra has been spending the past few days rehearsing with Amini in Baghdad.
     
    Works by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Johannes Brahms, Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky and several other world renowned composers will also be performed during this part.   
     
    Iraqi musician Mohammed Amin Ezzat will conduct the orchestra in the second part, during which the orchestra will perform a repertoire of music by Russian composer Modest Petrovich Mussorgsky, Hungarian composer Franz Liszt and several others. 
     
    MMS/YAW
    END
     

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    TEHRAN – Iran’s pavilion at the 22nd Minsk International Book Fair in Belarus have received an honorable mention for its beautiful decoration.
     
    Iran was attending the fair held at the national exhibition center BelExpo from February 11 to 15, Iran’s Cultural Attaché’s Office in Belarus announced in a press release on Wednesday.
     
    The organizers gave the honor to the pavilion, which was warmly received by visitors during the fair.
     
    Visitors asked for copies of a Russian translation of the Holy Quran and works by Persian poets Hafez, Rumi and Khayyam.
     
    Persian handicraft, posters of Persian paintings by master miniaturist Mahmud Farshchian and postcards bearing images of Iranian attractions were among the most asked for items at the pavilion.
     
    Over 30 countries, including Iraq, Turkey, Syria, France and Russia, attended the fair this year. China was the special guest of honor at the fair.
     
    RM/YAW
    END
     

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    TEHRAN – Iranian movies “Melbourne” and “Iranian Ninja” have won awards at the 21st Vesoul International Film Festival of Asian Cinema in France.
     
    Directed by Nima Javidi, “Melbourne” and Chinese director Yang Yishu’s “One Summer” shared the Prix du Jury ex-aequo in the international competition, the organizers announced on Tuesday.
     
    “Melbourne” won the award for the question on personal responsibility of a human being.
     
    “Melbourne” also won the INALCO Prize, which is presented by the National Institute of Oriental Languages and Civilizations. 
     
    The film tells the story of a young Iranian couple who take the risk of leaving home for a new life in the Australian coastal city of Melbourne.
     
    “Iranian Ninja”, as the sole Iranian film that competed in the documentary section, won the Young Jury Award, which is presented by the Urban Community of Vesoul.
     
    Directed by Marjan Riahi, the documentary chronicles the struggles of Khatereh Jalilzadeh in Tehran who teaches young girls how to twirl nunchucks and launch dropkicks.
     
    This year, eleven Iranian films were screened at the Vesoul festival, which is one of the most popular Asian film festivals in Europe. 
     
    MA/YAW
    END
     

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  • 02/20/15--12:32: Art news in brief
  • Persian version of “Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit” republished
    TEHRAN -- A Persian version of British philosopher Robert Stern’s book “Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit” has recently been republished.
     
    The book is about “The Phenomenology of Spirit”, German philosopher Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel’s first book and most important and widely discussed philosophical work. 
     
    Mohammad-Mehdi Aradebili is the translator of book whose first edition was published by Qoqnus Publications in 2002.
     
     
    Iran holds poetry night in Basra
    TEHRAN -- A number of Iranian and Iraqi poets came together in the southeastern Iraqi city of Basra on Thursday night to hold a poetry session.
     
    Abbas Hazbawi, Qasem ibn Rashid, Ali Yari, Fazel Mohseni and Afshin Ala were among the poets that attended the session.
     
    The meeting was jointly organized by the organizers of the Fajr International Poetry Festival and the Iranian cultural attaché’s office in Baghdad.
     
     
    Kiarostami’s master class cancelled at Arvand filmfest
    TEHRAN -- Iranian filmmaker Abbas Kiarostami’s master class at the 52nd Arvand Regional Short Film Festival was cancelled due to his illness, the organizers announced on Thursday.
     
    Kiarostami was scheduled to discuss making short films in the class, which was planned for February 21.
     
    The organizers replaced Kiarostami with his friend, writer Habib Ahmadzadeh. 
     
     
    Bekiroglu’s “Pomegranate Tree” hits Iranian bookstores 
    TEHRAN -- A Persian version of Turkish novelist Nazan Bekiroglu’s “The Pomegranate Tree” (“Nar Agaci”) has recently been published in Iran. 
     
    Published by Puyandeh, the book was translated into Persian by Maryam Tabatabaiiha. 
     
    The book’s story is set in Trabzon, Tabriz, Tbilisi, Batumi and Istanbul. It tells a richly imaginative tale of conflict and destiny using finely crafted characters and dexterous language against a backdrop of historical detail.
     
    MMS/YAW
    END

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    TEHRAN – The second edition of the Tehran Painting Symposium was inaugurated at the Qasr Garden Museum on Wednesday.
     
    14 artists will create their paintings in the main competition section with the central theme of ‘freedom’ and ‘Tehran’ during the five-day symposium, director of the museum said in a press release.
     
    Mohammadreza Saeidi added that the created works will be judged by a five-member jury panel selected by Iran’s Painters Association.
     
    The top three works will be awarded at the closing day, and afterwards all the works will be preserved in the treasure trove of the museum.
     
    Sorush Araam, Mina Ghaffari, Abbas Shamlu, Shahram Babaii, Zahra Maleki, Shiva Khoshbakhtnejad and Elaheh Mozaffari are among the participating artists.
     
    RM/YAW
    END
     

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    TEHRAN -- American saxophonist Bob Belden, who gave performances with his band Animation in Tehran, says he will never forget Iran.
     
    James Robert Belden known as Bob Belden attended the 30th Fajr International Music Festival with ‘Animation’ band members, and gave performances on the last day of the gala on Thursday, Persian media reported on Friday.
     
    Trumpeter Pete Clagett, keyboardist Roberto Verastegui, drummer Matt Young, and bassist Jair-Rohm Parker Wells are other members of ‘Animation’ who accompanied Belden in the Tehran performances.
     
    In his short speech before the concert, he expressed his happiness to have been visiting Iran, adding that he and his companions found love and happiness in the presence of the Iranian audience.
     
    He assured the audience that he would praise and say good things about Iran when he returns home.
     
    The musician also referred to their trips to the historical cities of Isfahan and Shiraz and added that they were delighted to see the cities and meet their good people.
     
    In addition, Belden said that during their trips, they met several young Iranian musicians who were very talented.
     
    He asserted that he liked Iran and its people very much and especially enjoyed Persian kebab.
     
    He called music the common language among all nations and said that he has found many friends through music in different countries.
     
    His speech was followed by performances of several pieces, some of which were from his Grammy nominee compositions.
     
    Speaking of his interest in visiting Iran again, he said that he would download their performance in Tehran on internet sites to let other people watch and see where the concert was performed.
     
    Deputy Culture Minister for Artistic Affairs Ali Moradkhani, secretary of the festival Ali Riyahi and musician Loris Tjeknavorian were special guests of their performance.
     
    The 30th edition of Fajr International Music Festival ran from February 13 to 20 in different venues across the Iranian capital Tehran.
     
    RM/YAW
    END
     

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    By Jay Shelton
    Kashan is a large city in Iran. With its origins dating back to late Neolithic times (approx. 7,000 BC), Kashan is one of the oldest human settlements in the world. Archaeological remains of artifacts and buildings dating back 9,000 years can still be found in the city.
     
    The city grew to become one of the most important trading centers of Iran between the 12th and 14th centuries. Following a gradual decline in population, the city was turned into a vacation spot for Safavid kings; you planted several gardens all over the city.
     
    Kashan is some 240 kilometers south of Tehran and is easily accessible by road.
     
    Things to Do in Kashan
     
    1. Visit the Aqa-Bozorg Mosque
     
    This beautiful mosque is often called one of the best examples of 19th century Qajar architecture.
     
    2. Discover the 5,000 years old remains of the Tepe Sialk ziggurat
     
    Tepe Sialk is the common name for the remains of a large ziggurat built by the Sialk people some 5,000 years ago. You can easily access it from the heart of the city, though you’ll need special permission to see the unearthed artifacts.
     
    3. Explore the gorgeous architecture of Kashan Bazaar
     
    The oldest bazaar in Kashan housed countless shops, inns and restaurants for hundreds of years.
     
    The shops still remain, some of them going back dozens of generations.
     
    The most stunning feature of the bazaar is its absolutely stunning ceiling.
     
    4. Experience traditional Persian architecture at the Tabatabaei House, Ameri House, and Abbasi House
     
    Kashan was a favorite vacation spot for Iran’s noblemen and wealthy traders in the 18th and 19th century, a number of whom built massive vacation homes in traditional Iranian style.
     
    While many of these houses were destroyed in earthquakes in the late 18th century, some survived, and some were rebuilt over the years. 
     
    5. See the stunning tile work in Sultan Amir Ahmad Bathhouse
     
    Kashan’s might as a trading hub was built on the expertise of its craftsmen in creating tiles and rugs. The former can still be seen in the stunning tile work in the beautiful Sultan Amir Ahmad Bathhouse, located near Sultan Amir Shrine.
     
    6. Walk through the vast Bagh-e-Fin Garden
     
    Originally built in the late 16th century, Fin Garden is the oldest extant garden in Iran and is spread over 2.3 hectares. It was added to the World Heritage Site list in 2012.
     
    The garden was modified by several different rulers over the years, who used it as a vacation spot. Consequently, the garden boasts architectural elements from different periods of Iranian history.
     
     
    7. Buy some authentic Kashan rugs
     
    Besides tiles, Kashan is also famous for its traditional Persian rugs. You can still buy these in shops all over the city, including the Kashan Bazaar.
     
    8. Enjoy a bowl of delicious khoresh-e-lubia
     
    “lubia sabz” refers to green beans in Persian; “khoresh” is the generic name given to any stew-like dish.
     
    This local favorite basically combines green beans with lamb, mutton or beef in a lightly spiced stew topped with saffron. 
     
    9. Head out to Aran va Bidgol to see the shrine of Imamzadeh Hilal ibn Ali
     
    Aran va Bidgol is a small town located some 6 kilometers from Kashan. This town is home to the beautiful shrine of Imamzadeh Hilal ibn Ali, son of Imam Ali (AS). 
     
    Another popular sight in Aran o Bidgol is the Maranjab Caravansary, a 400 year old caravansary (an inn for caravans) that was an important stop along the Silk Road.
     
    10. Explore the traditional architecture of the village of Abyaneh
     
    Abyaneh (also called the red village) is a tiny village (population: 305) located on the south of Kashan. One of the best preserved villages in Iran, Abyaneh has houses and buildings dating back hundreds of years. Come here to see traditional architecture of the region and breathtaking views of the nearby mountains.
     
    http://flavorverse.com/
     

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    TEHRAN - Veteran Iranian film critic, author and filmmaker Zaven Qukasian passed away at his home in Isfahan on Friday following a battle with stomach cancer. He was 64.
     
    He spent the five months prior to February in a hospital in Vienna receiving treatment for his illness, some Persian news websites announced on Friday. 
     
    He pursued treatment at Al Zahrawi Hospital after returning to his hometown of Isfahan in early February. 
     
    Born into an Iranian-Armenian family in 1950, Qukasian, whose career in filmmaking spans nearly 40 years, directed a number of movies, short films and documentaries. 
     
    He was the author of a large number books and biographies of prominent Iranian filmmakers and stars, including Bahram Beizaii, Masud Kimiaii, Abbas Kiarostami, Bahman Farmanara, Khosro Sinaii, Golab Adineh, Reza Arham-Sadr and Fatemeh Motamed-Arya.
     
    He made his debut feature “All My Children” in 1984. He had previously directed the short films “Ancient Bride” and “Another Season”, and the documentaries “Jolfa, My Museum” and “The Picture of Imagination”. 
     
    Qukasian will be laid to rest beside the tombs of his parents in the Armenian Cemetery in Isfahan.  
     
    MA/YAW
    END
     

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  • 02/21/15--13:23: Art news in brief
  • “A Few Cubic Meters of Love” to compete in Canadian filmfest 
    TEHRAN – “A Few Cubic Meters of Love”, directed by Tehran-based Afghan filmmaker Jamshid Mahmudi, will be screened at the Reel World Film Festival to be held in Toronto from March 2 to 8.  
     
    The story of the film is set somewhere in the outskirts of Tehran, where a small factory illegally employs Afghan asylum seekers who live with their families in old shipping containers or modest shacks in nearby shanty towns. Saber, a young Iranian worker, secretly meets Marona, daughter of Abdolsalam, an Afghan worker. A love story unfolds.
     
    Iranian heavy metal band performs at Azadi Tower
    TEHRAN – Kahtmayan, an Iranian heavy metal band, will perform a concert at Tehran’s Azadi Tower this evening.  
     
    The band composed of four Iranian musicians has previously released two albums.
     
    MA/YAW
    END
     

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    TEHRAN – The 12th edition of the Image of the Year and Tassvir Film Festival opened at the Iranian Artists Forum (IAF) on Friday.
     
    The annual exhibition has been divided into the two sections of non-competition and main competition for the youth under 25, IAF announced in a press release on Saturday.
     
    A collection of 185 artworks in different sections of photos, graphic designs and cartoons have been put on display in different galleries of the Forum.
     
    The two sections “Our Iran” and “Cell Phone Photos” will open on the sidelines of the exhibit during the coming days. 
     
    Veteran artists Ebrahim Haqiqi, Aidin Aghdashlu, Mahmud Farnud, Ahmad Moeini, Kambiz Derambakhsh and Akbar Alami are scheduled to be honored for their lifetime achievements during the exhibit.
     
    In addition, 114 films have been selected to be screened in the two sections of non-competition and the competition section for the youth under age 25.
     
    Selections of films screened at the 33rd Fajr International Film Festival, winners of Cinéma Vérité, Tehran International Short Film Festival, and Iran Cinema Celebration will also go on screen during the Tassvir festival. 
     
    The annual exhibition will be running until March 10, and the film festival will end on March 11. 
     
    The Forum is located on Musavi St. off Taleqani Ave.
     
    RM/YAW
    END
     
     
     
     
     
     
     

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    Sari Gelin is a familiar love song for most people who live in Iran and neighbor countries. The song is the words of a boy complaining to/about a girl he loves but cannot achieve.
     
    Sari Gelin is preformed in different versions with different lyric but with the same melody written in Bayati, the most popular genre for folk poetry in Azeri.
     
    There are many different lyrical interpretations of Sari Gelin among Armenians, Azerbaijanis, Georgians, Persians, and Turks. 
     
    Turkish, Azerbaijani and Armenian versions narrate the laments of a Muslim Turkish boy, about a Christian Armenian blond maiden from a mountain or valley that he loves, although they are kept apart, and the “unkind” girl is taken away, causing the boy to lament and curse frequently. 
     
     
    Turkish version: love story in Erzurum 
     
    In Turkish language “sari” means yellow, golden, blonde or fair-skinned. 
     
    The word Gelin in Azerbaijani and Turkish means someone who comes to the family (bride), with its root in the Turkish verb “Gel”, which means “come”.
     
    Thus Sari Gelin can mean “golden”, “blonde” or “fair-skinned” bride. 
     
    In Turkey, Sari Gelin is a popular folk story about an impossible love between a Turkish boy and an Armenian girl from Erzurum. 
     
    Turkish singers Yavuz Bingöl and Kiraç performed the Turkish version of the song.
     
    Azerbaijani version: Love happens in Karabakh
     
    In Azerbaijani language, “sari” means yellow or blonde but it may also refer to a person’s soul as well. 
     
    In Azerbaijan, Sari Gelin (Blond Maiden) is a legend that symbolizes the love between a Muslim Azerbaijani boy and a Christian Kipchak girl who are kept apart.
     
    The story sets in Karabakh, a controversial region disputed between Armenia and Azerbaijan. An Azeri boy falls in love with an Armenian girl, which is futile.
     
    Vocalists Alim Qasimov and Abbas Bagirov performed the Azerbaijani version of the song.
     
    Armenian version: Sari Aghjik
     
    In some Armenian versions of the song, the Armenian word Aghjik (Girl) is used instead.
     
    Sari may also be derived from the Armenian word saro, meaning “of the mountain”, which is the meaning used in the Armenian versions of the song (“Girl/Bride from the mountains”).
     
    There are two Armenian versions of “Sari Gelin”. According to one version, Sari Gelin was an Armenian girl, and a young man from Erzurum fell in love with her. 
     
    Another version is about a Turkish Muslim who sees a very pretty Armenian girl and he falls in love with her and starts to follow her around. 
     
    But he is Muslim and she is Christian. Hence their families don’t want them to marry each other. The lovers end up running away together but the girl’s father, a powerful man, come after them with his men and kill the Turkish man. 
     
    Singers Ruben Matevosyan and Gevorg Chakmanyan are amongst the Armenian vocalists who performed “Sari Gelin”.
     
    Iranian version: Persian Saray
     
    In Iran, there is a famous Azeri fable about a girl named Saray. Some people relate it to Sari Gelin song.
     
    The Persian version happened in Mugan plain, located in northwestern Iran and the southern part of the Republic of Azerbaijan. 
     
    A girl with blonde hair was born in a village near Aras River. Her parents named her Saray, which is a combination of sari and ay (moon), which means golden moon. 
     
    Saray was engaged to a shepherd however the khan falls in love with her. Despite her reluctance, she is doomed to a forced marriage with khan. Before the marriage, she commits suicide in Aras River.
     
    The Iranian celebrated tar virtuoso Hossein Alizadeh accompanied by Grammy nominated Armenian musician Djivan Gasparyan performed the Armenian version of Sari Gelin.
     
    However they use the Turkish line “Sari Gelin aman!” in their performance. 
     
    Love has border!
     
    The song depicts an unfulfilled love between lovers of different nations. They cannot marry because of their lands, beliefs and traditions.
     
    Hence, it comes as no surprise that there is no consensus about the song’s country of origin as well. The song is still a subject of contention and accusations of plagiarism among the countries where it is popular.

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    TEHRAN -- Iranian Minister of Culture and Islamic Guidance Ali Jannati has strongly criticized certain groups for their opposition to holding concerts and musical events, and called them “the obstinate” with little knowledge of religious rules and music.
     
    In an address to the audience at the closing ceremony of the 30th Fajr International Music Festival at Tehran’s Vahdat Hall on Friday evening, he said that his office will never give up on the obstinacy of the groups.
     
    “It is our duty to observe rules and law in the field of music, but we shall never give up on the obstinate. Because most of these people are in the novice element and we stand head and shoulders above them in knowledge of many fields such as religion, art and music,” Jannati stated.
     
    “Unfortunately, some political groups, who have problems with the government of President Hassan Rouhani, misuse people’s religious beliefs and provoke religious people by distorting facts and spreading false news,” he added.  
     
    He made the remarks in response to the people’s decision to prevent some concerts during the 30th Fajr International Music Festival, which was held in Tehran and several other Iranian cities from February 13 to 20.
     
    In early February, the groups also provoked a controversy about the release of the album “Love You, O Ancient Land” allegedly containing solo performances by a female singer, something that is forbidden in Iran. 
     
    However, all tracks of the album were performed by a choir of a female singer, Noshin Tafi and a male singer, Mohsen Keramati.
     
    Several Iranian music groups were honored at the end of the ceremony.
     
    Avaye Mahan won the award for best vocal band and the Pasargad Symphony Orchestra received the award for best ensemble in Western classical music.
     
    The award for best ensemble in Iranian classical music went to Hamnazane Iran.
     
    MMS/YAW
    END
     

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    TEHRAN – The southwestern Iranian city of Ahvaz has been designated Iran’s Book Capital from among ten nominations competing for the position. 
     
    The city was selected by a jury of seven experts during a meeting in Tehran on Saturday, the secretary of the Committee for Selecting Iran’s Book Capital, Mohammad Solgi, announced in a press release. 
     
    Nine other nominations were Bushehr, Yazd, Tabriz, Shahr-e Kord, Qom, Kashan, Kermanshah, Gonbad-e Kavus and Neyshabur.
     
    The jury was composed of National Library and Archives of Iran Director Reza Salehi-Amiri, Iranian National Commission for UNESCO Director Mohammadreza Saeidabadi, Deputy Minister of Culture and Islamic Guidance for Cultural Affairs Seyyed Abbas Salehi, Iran Public Libraries Foundation Secretary General Alireza Mokhtarpur and Tehran City Council member Ahmad Masjed-Jamei.
     
    Other members were Mohammadreza Tavakkoli Seddiqi, the representative of the Union of Tehran Publishers and Bookstores, and Mohsen Hajiabadi Zeinolabedini, the representative of Iranian Librarianship and Dissemination Association.
     
    UNESCO initiated the concept of World Book Capital City for the first time in 2001 in acknowledgement of the best programs dedicated to books and reading after selecting Madrid as World Book Capital City for 2001.
     
    RM/YAW
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  • 02/21/15--13:23: Art news in brief
  • “A Few Cubic Meters of Love” to compete in Canadian filmfest 
    TEHRAN – “A Few Cubic Meters of Love”, directed by Tehran-based Afghan filmmaker Jamshid Mahmudi, will be screened at the Reel World Film Festival to be held in Toronto from March 2 to 8.  
     
    The story of the film is set somewhere in the outskirts of Tehran, where a small factory illegally employs Afghan asylum seekers who live with their families in old shipping containers or modest shacks in nearby shanty towns. Saber, a young Iranian worker, secretly meets Marona, daughter of Abdolsalam, an Afghan worker. A love story unfolds.
     
    Iranian heavy metal band performs at Azadi Tower
    TEHRAN – Kahtmayan, an Iranian heavy metal band, will perform a concert at Tehran’s Azadi Tower this evening.  
     
    The band composed of four Iranian musicians has previously released two albums.
     
    MA/YAW
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    TEHRAN – The 12th edition of the Image of the Year and Tassvir Film Festival opened at the Iranian Artists Forum (IAF) on Friday.
     
    The annual exhibition has been divided into the two sections of non-competition and main competition for the youth under 25, IAF announced in a press release on Saturday.
     
    A collection of 185 artworks in different sections of photos, graphic designs and cartoons have been put on display in different galleries of the Forum.
     
    The two sections “Our Iran” and “Cell Phone Photos” will open on the sidelines of the exhibit during the coming days. 
     
    Veteran artists Ebrahim Haqiqi, Aidin Aghdashlu, Mahmud Farnud, Ahmad Moeini, Kambiz Derambakhsh and Akbar Alami are scheduled to be honored for their lifetime achievements during the exhibit.
     
    In addition, 114 films have been selected to be screened in the two sections of non-competition and the competition section for the youth under age 25.
     
    Selections of films screened at the 33rd Fajr International Film Festival, winners of Cinéma Vérité, Tehran International Short Film Festival, and Iran Cinema Celebration will also go on screen during the Tassvir festival. 
     
    The annual exhibition will be running until March 10, and the film festival will end on March 11. 
     
    The Forum is located on Musavi St. off Taleqani Ave.
     
    RM/YAW
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    Sari Gelin is a familiar love song for most people who live in Iran and neighbor countries. The song is the words of a boy complaining to/about a girl he loves but cannot achieve.
     
    Sari Gelin is preformed in different versions with different lyric but with the same melody written in Bayati, the most popular genre for folk poetry in Azeri.
     
    There are many different lyrical interpretations of Sari Gelin among Armenians, Azerbaijanis, Georgians, Persians, and Turks. 
     
    Turkish, Azerbaijani and Armenian versions narrate the laments of a Muslim Turkish boy, about a Christian Armenian blond maiden from a mountain or valley that he loves, although they are kept apart, and the “unkind” girl is taken away, causing the boy to lament and curse frequently. 
     
     
    Turkish version: love story in Erzurum 
     
    In Turkish language “sari” means yellow, golden, blonde or fair-skinned. 
     
    The word Gelin in Azerbaijani and Turkish means someone who comes to the family (bride), with its root in the Turkish verb “Gel”, which means “come”.
     
    Thus Sari Gelin can mean “golden”, “blonde” or “fair-skinned” bride. 
     
    In Turkey, Sari Gelin is a popular folk story about an impossible love between a Turkish boy and an Armenian girl from Erzurum. 
     
    Turkish singers Yavuz Bingöl and Kiraç performed the Turkish version of the song.
     
    Azerbaijani version: Love happens in Karabakh
     
    In Azerbaijani language, “sari” means yellow or blonde but it may also refer to a person’s soul as well. 
     
    In Azerbaijan, Sari Gelin (Blond Maiden) is a legend that symbolizes the love between a Muslim Azerbaijani boy and a Christian Kipchak girl who are kept apart.
     
    The story sets in Karabakh, a controversial region disputed between Armenia and Azerbaijan. An Azeri boy falls in love with an Armenian girl, which is futile.
     
    Vocalists Alim Qasimov and Abbas Bagirov performed the Azerbaijani version of the song.
     
    Armenian version: Sari Aghjik
     
    In some Armenian versions of the song, the Armenian word Aghjik (Girl) is used instead.
     
    Sari may also be derived from the Armenian word saro, meaning “of the mountain”, which is the meaning used in the Armenian versions of the song (“Girl/Bride from the mountains”).
     
    There are two Armenian versions of “Sari Gelin”. According to one version, Sari Gelin was an Armenian girl, and a young man from Erzurum fell in love with her. 
     
    Another version is about a Turkish Muslim who sees a very pretty Armenian girl and he falls in love with her and starts to follow her around. 
     
    But he is Muslim and she is Christian. Hence their families don’t want them to marry each other. The lovers end up running away together but the girl’s father, a powerful man, come after them with his men and kill the Turkish man. 
     
    Singers Ruben Matevosyan and Gevorg Chakmanyan are amongst the Armenian vocalists who performed “Sari Gelin”.
     
    Iranian version: Persian Saray
     
    In Iran, there is a famous Azeri fable about a girl named Saray. Some people relate it to Sari Gelin song.
     
    The Persian version happened in Mugan plain, located in northwestern Iran and the southern part of the Republic of Azerbaijan. 
     
    A girl with blonde hair was born in a village near Aras River. Her parents named her Saray, which is a combination of sari and ay (moon), which means golden moon. 
     
    Saray was engaged to a shepherd however the khan falls in love with her. Despite her reluctance, she is doomed to a forced marriage with khan. Before the marriage, she commits suicide in Aras River.
     
    The Iranian celebrated tar virtuoso Hossein Alizadeh accompanied by Grammy nominated Armenian musician Djivan Gasparyan performed the Armenian version of Sari Gelin.
     
    However they use the Turkish line “Sari Gelin aman!” in their performance. 
     
    Love has border!
     
    The song depicts an unfulfilled love between lovers of different nations. They cannot marry because of their lands, beliefs and traditions.
     
    Hence, it comes as no surprise that there is no consensus about the song’s country of origin as well. The song is still a subject of contention and accusations of plagiarism among the countries where it is popular.

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