Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Showcase


Channel Catalog


Channel Description:

Tehran Times - Iran's Leading International Daily

older | 1 | .... | 83 | 84 | (Page 85) | 86 | 87 | .... | 174 | newer

    0 0

    TEHRAN -- Iranian director Kianush Ayyari has said that he made “The Paternal House” to criticize blind fanaticism in Iranian society.

     
    A dressing the Iranian cultural officials during a press conference after a screening of the film at the 32nd Fajr International Film Festival in Tehran on Saturday evening, Ayyari said, “Please, don’t censor me and don’t expect me not to make a film on major issues on my society.”
     
    “‘The Paternal House’ is about the reality of our society and I wanted to censure the blind fanaticism by making the film,” he added.
     
    The film contains three episodes, the first of which is set in 1929 when a father and his young son, Mohtasham, kill his young daughter for an unspecified dishonor, burying her body in the cellar of their house while other members of the family are outside. They tell the family she has run away. 
     
    The second episode is also set in the house during the 1940s when mother dies of a stroke after she learns about the secret.
     
    Decades later, when the father dies, Mohtasham’s daughter challenges father for his role in the murder. All the episodes highlight the oppression of women.
     
    The controversial drama was directed in 2010 with commercial sponsorship from Naji Honar, a major filmmaking institute that is affiliated with Iran’s National Police.
     
    The film became a matter of great sensitivity after former cinema officials under the Mahmoud Ahmadinejad’s administration, refused to authorize the film. As a result, Naji Honar objected to the screening of the film.
     
    The officials had asked Ayyari to cut the first episode and some scenes from other episodes to authorize the film. 
     
    However, the Iran Cinema Organization granted temporary permission for the film to be screened at the Fajr festival, which will come to an end on Tuesday.    
     
    “The film has had 25 screenings over the past three days at a number of theaters and all the people who saw the film said that there was no reason the film should be banned unless there had been a misunderstanding,” Ayyari said.
     
    He was pleased that “The Paternal House” was given the opportunity to be shown at the Fajr festival. However, he was not sure the film would remain intact for public screening in Iran.
     
    “Any cut will spoil the film,” he noted.
     
    MMS/YAW
    END

    0 0

    TEHRAN – The celebrated French pianist Nicolas Horvath performed pieces composed by the Iranian musician Morteza Shirkuhi in his recent recital in Kiev, Ukraine.
     
    Entitled “The Night of Minimal Piano”, the nine-hour recital started on February 15 at 11 pm and ended the next morning at Kiev’s House of Architect.
     
    During the event, Horvath played pieces from Shirkuhi’s recent album “Artiman” along with several piano pieces by the world’s best composers.
     
    Jaan Rääts and Mihkel Kerem from Estonia; Alvin Curran William Susman and Philip Glass from the U.S.; Jean Catoire from France; and Carlos Perón Cano from Spain were among the composers whose works were performed during the event. 
     
    SB/YAW
    END

    0 0

    TEHRAN – The 13th International Radio Festival of Iran will be held in Tehran from May 10 to 12.
     
    The 5th International Radio Forum will be held concurrently with the festival, which is organized by the Islamic Republic of Iran Broadcasting (IRIB). 
     
    Some members of Asia-Pacific Broadcasting Union (ABU) and the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) will attend the event, IRIB Deputy Director in radio Mohammad-Hossein Sufi said in a press release on Monday.
     
    Several broadcasters and programmers will attend the event, which will be held with the motto of “Radio: Medium of Knowledge and Hope”.
     
    The 5th International Radio Forum “Rethinking Radio” is presented by the Asia-Pacific Broadcasting Union (ABU) and the Islamic Republic of Iran Broadcasting (IRIB)  in cooperation with Iranian and non-Iranian academics. 
     
    The conference aimed at revising and rethinking the radio medium in terms of multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches. 
     
    SB/YAW
    END

    0 0

    TEHRAN – The Iranian Academy of Arts (IAA) has recently published photos of Iranian masterpieces kept in museums or by private collectors across Poland in a two-volume collection.
     
    The two-volume collection includes photos and articles about over 400 items displayed in two exhibits in Poland in 2002, IAA reported in a press release on Monday.
     
    In 2002, a total of 30 museums and libraries, eight churches and monasteries, and six private collectors exhibited their Persian collections in the National Museum in Warsaw and later in the National Museum in Krakow. 
     
    Photos of paintings, drawings, calligraphy, Persian carpets, earthenware, metal dishes and coins are included in the first volume.
     
    The second volume is dedicated to articles in Persian and English written by eight Iranian art experts supervised by Tadeusz Majda, a scholar from the Faculty of Oriental Studies at the University of Warsaw.
     
    RM/YAW
    END

    0 0

    TEHRAN – Leili Anvar, a Professor of Persian language and literature at the Institut National des Langues et Civilizations Orientales (INALCO) in Paris, says that the French have a dreamlike image of Persian poetry.

     
    Anvar, who last week received Iran’s Book of the Year Award for her French translation of “Le cantique des oiseaux” (The Conference of the Bird) by Persian poet and mystic Attar Neyshaburi (C. 1145-1221), said that her personal interest in mystical literature inspired her to translate these types of works.
     
    In an interview with the Persian service of IRNA, she added that in her belief the high importance of literature is in its mysticism and that is why she found more interest in the poetry of Attar and Persian mystic and poet Molana Jalal ad-Din Rumi (1207-1273).
     
    She also said that the translation of these books helps to provide a new image of Islam for those who want to learn more about Islamic mysticism. 
     
    The translation of the book took about four years, she said, adding that it is the poetry which makes her translation different from previous translations.
     
    The poetry of Attar is so beautiful and deep in concept, and its music is familiar to the spirit, so if it was rendered into prose, it would be disloyalty, she continued.
     
    Asked about the interest of French students in the Persian language, she added that the French may not know much about Persian poetry but they have a dreamlike image of it.
     
    Anvar has studied Persian and English literature and civilization at the University of Sorbonne Nouvelle (Paris), where she received her Ph.D. in Persian Literature.
     
    Her publications include other translations of Rumi’s poetry as well as “The Art of Spiritual Flight” (2007) and “Malek Jan Nemati” (2007). 
     
    RM/YAW
    END

    0 0

    TEHRAN -- The Muslim cleric Ayatollah Nasser Makarem Shirazi was angered by the depiction of members of Shia imam’s households in “Hussein, Who Said No”, a blockbuster about the uprising of Imam Hussein (AS), which premiered at the 32nd Fajr International Film Festival in Tehran last week.

     
    In a letter sent to the Iran Cinema Organization on Sunday, Ayatollah Makarem Shirazi wrote, “A significant number of people have complained to my office that ‘Hussein, Who Said No’ has graphically depicted the faces of Hazrat Abbas (AS) and a number of martyrs of Ashura.
     
    “We know that this action will cause a negative impact and they have also compalined about the quality of narration of some historical events.
     
    “Does the Iran Cinema Organization plan to infringe upon sanctities and ignore the redlines?” 
     
    A certain group of people led by a number of major eulogists of the mourning ceremonies for Imam Hussein (AS) during the month of Muharram also gathered at Tehran’s Ark Mosque on Sunday to protest against the film directed by Ahmadreza Darvish, who is mostly known for his films on the 1980-1988 Iran-Iraq war, which is known as the Sacred Defense in Iran.
     
    “Distortion of the facts and disrespect for the Prophet’s Household (AS) are never acceptable,” Coordination Council of Hezbollah Forces Director Hossein Allahkaram said during the meeting.
     
    “Our remarks are not a criticism but are a protest,” he added.
     
    Iran Cinema Organization Director Hojjatollah Ayyubi responded to the letter during his speech at the closing ceremony of the Fajr Film Festival in Mashhad on Sunday.
     
    He said that before the production of the film, its producers had gained the necessary fatwa and permission from the ulama for the depiction of Hazrat Abbas (AS), the brother of Imam Hussein (AS).
     
    “Any criticism about the facts and the context of the movie should be discussed by the producers and the representatives of the ulama in an appropriate peaceful atmosphere,” he added.
     
    “Unfortunately, sometimes big national projects may be attacked for party interests and political purposes. But, I hope this atmosphere is removed and the film is discussed by experts in a peaceful environment,” he stated.
     
    In addition, Minister of Culture and Islamic Guidance Ali Jannati has also commented about the issue.
     
    “The ulama’s concerns about the film should be taken into consideration before the screening of the film,” he said on the sidelines of a press conference on Monday.
     
    Darvish spent about nine years completing “Hussein, Who Said No”, which was previously known as “Resurrection Day”.
     
    A large number of professionals were hired for the project, which was completed by commercial sponsorship from a number of major governmental organizations.
     
    The film is about the uprising of Imam Hussein (AS) against the tyranny of the Umayyad dynasty on Ashura, the tenth day of Muharram on which the Imam and his companions were martyred in 680.
     
    The faces of Hazrat Ali-Akbar (AS) and Hazrat Ali-Asghar (AS), the sons of Imam Hussein (AS), and Hazrat Qasim (AS), the son of Imam Hassan (AS) have been depicted graphically in scenes of the film.
     
    The depiction of Prophet Muhammad (S) and his household (AS) in any art production are not allowed.    
     
    “Hussein, Who Said No” won five Crystal Simorghs in the categories of best film, best director, best composer, best cinematographer, and best costume and set designer at the Fajr film festival.   
     
    MMS/YAW
    END

    0 0

    TEHRAN -- Paintings by the winners of the four previous editions of the Damonfar Painting Biennial will be showcased in an exhibition, which will open at Tehran’s Shirin Gallery on Friday.
     
    The works have been created on theme of “Eraser” for the exhibit, which will be curated by Behnam Kamrani.
     
    “The exhibition will be held to show the improvement of the winners, who are actually members of the Damonfar family,” Damonfar Company Managing Director Seifollah Puya-Rad said in a press release on Tuesday.
     
    The exhibition aims to feature the different viewpoints and concepts about the eraser as a device, he added.
     
    Works by Pegah Lari, Bahman Mohammadi, Adel Yunesi, Sara Abri, Nassim Taqipur, Sina Chupani, Nafiseh Omran and 14 other young artists have been selected for the exhibition, which will run until March 7.
     
    Damonfar is the Iranian representative of France’s Pebeo and Canson, and Germany’s Faber-Castell, three companies that manufacture art materials.
     
    The Shirin gallery is located at No. 9, 18th St. in the Velenjak neighborhood.
     
    SB/YAW
    END

    0 0

    TEHRAN – A life-sized silicon statue of the Founder of the Islamic Republic of Iran, Imam Khomeini, will go on display in the Museum of Luminaries at Tehran’s Milad Tower in the near future.
     
    Commissioned by Milad Tower, the statue is due to be unveiled during a special ceremony, sculptor Alireza Khaqani told the Persian service of MNA on Tuesday.
     
    Khaqani has recently completed a series of life-sized silicon statues of national heroes including Amir Kabir (1807-1852), the chief minister of the Qajar king Nasser ad-Din Shah, Ali Shariati (1933-1977), an Iranian revolutionary and scholar, and Mohammad Mosaddeq, the prime minister of Iran from 1951 until 1953.
     
    Khaqani’s collection, comprised of statues of a number of contemporary Iranian luminaries, was showcased in an exhibition at the Iranian Artists Forum in summer; the collection later was moved to the Museum of Luminaries.
     
    Khaqani, who has long worked on making silicon prostheses, says that he has found silicon to be a material which can be made to have a texture similar to human skin.
     
    RM/YAW
    END

    0 0

    TEHRAN – The winners of the first edition of the Balkh Book Awards were announced during a ceremony at Tehran’s Research Center for Art, Culture and Architecture, the organizers announced on Monday.
     
    The awards were established by Iran’s Alhoda International Publications to honor books on history, culture, society and politics in Afghanistan. The institute aims to boost cultural relations between Iran and Afghanistan by organizing the event.
     
    Several figures active in the field of the culture of Afghanistan were honored during the ceremony including writers and researchers Mohammad Vaezi, Hassan Anusheh, Mohammad-Hossein Jafarian, and Iran’s Cultural Attache in Afghanistan Naser Jahanshahi.
     
    The awards were given to the winners in the two categories of literature and politics.
     
    “This Persian Sugar” by Mashhad-based Afghan poet Mohammad-Kazem Kazemi, “Red Rose of a Troubled-Heart” by Mohammad-Javad Khavari and “Resistance Poetry of Afghanistan” by Abutaleb Mozaffari and Nader Ahmadi received the awards in the literature category.
     
    The winners of the political category included “The Beginning of an End” by Abdolqader Asi, “Personal Feelings of Afghanistan’s Shia” by Abdollah Shafaei, and “Afghanistan in the Recent Five Centuries” by Mir-Mohammad Sediq Farhang.
     
    RM/YAW
    END

    0 0

    TEHRAN -- Six Iranian films will be reviewed during a weeklong program at the House of Cinema (Casa del Cinema) in Rome next week.

     
    “Facing Mirrors” directed by Negar Azarbaijani, “Gold and Copper” by Homayun Asadian, “Saadatabad” Maziar Miri, “Fireworks Wednesday” by Asghar Farhadi, “Here without Me” by Bahram Tavakkoli, and “Mr. Yusef” by Ali Rafiei will be screened during the program, “Facing Mirrors” producer Fereshteh Taerpur told the Persian service of ISNA on Tuesday.
     
    The program will begin with the screening of “Facing Mirrors”, a film on the transgender issue, on February 26. Taerpur is scheduled to deliver a speech at the opening ceremony of the program.
     
    “It is an ideal opportunity to watch ‘Facing Mirrors’ with Italian filmgoers,” Taerpur said.
     
    “Experiencing the hospitality of Rome’s House of Cinema, becoming familiar with the institute, and comparing it with the Iranian House of Cinema will be great outcomes of my trip to Rome,” she stated.
     
    “The international film festivals, which are organized in Italy every year, screen some Iranian movies that usually win awards. These events have kept open the windows of cultural relations between Italy and Iran,” Taerpur added.
     
    MMS/YAW
    END

    0 0

    TEHRAN – “The Painting Pool” producer Manucher Mohammadi received the UNESCO Award, which his film won at the 7th Annual Asia Pacific Screen Awards (APSA) in Australia in December 2013, during a ceremony in Tehran on Monday.

     
    The ceremony was organized by the Embassy of Australia and Ambassador Paul Foley handed over the award to Mohammadi at his official residence.
     
    Director Maziar Miri, actress Negar Javaherian, scriptwriter Hamed Mohammadi, a representative from the UNESCO Tehran Cluster Office, members of the Iranian House of Cinema and Iran’s Sureh Cinema Organization also attended the ceremony.
     
    “It is easy to see why the film impressed the judges,” Foley said.
     
    “It is a sympathetic and moving portrayal of the struggles of Soheil and his parents, and the family of Soheil’s teacher, set against the very recognizable backdrop of contemporary Tehran” he added.
     
    Mohammadi dedicated the award to Miri, who also presented it to scriptwriter Hamed Mohammadi.
     
    The film won the UNESCO Award for “outstanding contribution to the promotion and preservation of cultural diversity through film,” the APSA jury previously said during at the award ceremony in Brisbane in December 2013. 
     
    Since Mohammadi and his colleagues were unable to attend the APSA ceremony in Brisbane, they received the award in Tehran.
     
    APSA is endorsed by UNESCO, with which it shares a common goal -– to foster cultural diversity and promote mutual understanding, dialogue and peace. 
     
    APSA also has the endorsement of the International Federation of Film Producers Associations (FIAPF), which regulates the world’s most important film festivals and events.
     
    SB/YAW
    END

    0 0

    TEHRAN – An Iranian audience warmly received a duet performed by the Tunisian oud virtuoso Anouar Brahem’s band at Tehran’s Vahdat Hall on Tuesday evening.
     
    The ensemble performed a fusion of Western and Oriental music in its program arranged for the 29th Fajr International Music Festival, the Persian service of ISNA reported on Wednesday.
     
    German bass clarinetist Klaus Gesing, Swedish bassist Bjorn Meyer and Lebanese percussionist Khaled Yassine accompanied Brahem in the performance.
     
    The ensemble next performed pieces in memory of Palestinian poet Mahmoud Darwish (1941-2008) from the album “The Astounding Eyes of Rita”.
     
    Addressing the audience during their performance, Brahem expressed his happiness and said that he has long wished to come to Iran and that he is happy he is in Tehran.
     
    The 29th Fajr International Music Festival will come to an end today.
     
    RM/YAW
    END

    0 0

    TEHRAN – The Iranian acclaimed psychodrama “Cat and Fish” is competing at the 13th !f Istanbul International Independent Film Festival.
     
    This film along with eight movies from other countries will be screened in at !f !nspired International Competition of the festival, which is currently underway in Turkey.
     
    “Cat and Fish” tells the story of a group of students, who travel to a remote region to participate in a kite-flying event. Next to their camp by the lakeside, they find a restaurant with cooks that treat the students with suspicion. Bizarre events lead to a complicated situation, from which the students cannot escape.
     
    Open to first and second-time directors from around the world and Turkey, the !f !nspired festival is designed to discover and award the emerging visions in cinema. 
     
    “The Selfish Giant” by Clio Barnard from the UK, “The Disobedient” by Mina Djukic from Serbia, “The Blue Wave” by Zeynep Dadak and Merve Kayan from Turkey, and  “Manakamana” by Stephanie Spray and Pacho Velez from Nepal are among the competitors of the festival.
     
    “Cat and Fish” has received accolades at several international events. It won the special jury prize at the 10th Dubai International Film Festival (DIFF) in December 2013. 
     
    It also won the best film award at the 13th Lisbon and Estoril Film Festival in Portugal on November 18.
     
    The 70th Venice International Film Festival honored the film with the Special Orizzonti Award for Innovative Content in September.
     
    SB/YAW
    END

    0 0

    TEHRAN – The six-year-old Iranian girl Nazanin Eftekhari and the Guatemalan girl Maria David Sandoval Santos have shared the first prize in the art category of Spain’s 2013 Peace and Cooperation School Award competition.

     
    They won the prize among the children who sent artworks for the up to 6-year-old section of the contest, which is held by the Spanish Foundation for Peace and Cooperation.
     
    In addition, Iranian children Azar Sanaii, Helen Sadeqi, Nadia Hashempur, Negar Moradeskandari and Aida Fathi received honorable mentions in this section.
     
    The Iranian girl, Zahra Mirhashemi, also received an honorable mention in the Drawing with Written Message Section of the contest.
     
    This year, the Spanish Foundation for Peace and Cooperation organized the Peace and Cooperation School Award Ceremony at the Mexican Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Mexico City on February 7.
     
    The competition was held on the theme of “Art as a Universal Language - Creativity for Peace”.
     
    The Peace and Cooperation School Award is an international school competition organized annually by the Spanish Foundation for Peace and Cooperation, a Madrid-based non-governmental organization that works to promote a movement of non-violence and creativity and to build a world of solidarity.
      
    It was founded in 1982 by Sr. Joaquin Astuña, a Spanish barrister, educator, publicist, polyglot and social activist who has worked in various capacities with many United Nations bodies.
     
    SB/YAW
    END

    0 0

    TEHRAN -- A Persian audio book of American writer Jean Webster’s 1912 epistolary novel “Daddy-Long-Legs” has been published in Tehran.

     
    The audio book was unveiled during a ceremony at Tehran’s Book City Institute on Monday evening. 
     
    The narrators of the audio book Zohreh Shokufandeh and Jorj Petrosian, translator Golnar Navidan and a number of cultural figures attended the ceremony.
     
    “Daddy-Long-Legs” follows the protagonist, a young girl named Jerusha “Judy” Abbott, through her college years. She writes letters to her benefactor, a rich man whom she has never seen.
     
    The audio book has been recorded and released by Raha Films, a major Iranian studio, in which Asghar Farhadi’s French-language film “The Past” was dubbed into Persian.    
     
    “I think the idea of the publication of audio books is amazing,” said Shokufandeh, who previously voiced the character of Judy in “My Daddy Long Legs”, a 1990 Japanese anime television series based on “Daddy-Long-Legs”, for the Islamic Republic of Iran Broadcasting.
     
    “Sometimes we do not have the opportunity to read a book or we are unable to concentrate. Or sometimes, we are stuck in heavy traffic and our time is going to waste. Listening to these books could lessen stress and anxiety in this situation,” she added.
     
    The narrating the audio book has been directed by Shokufandeh. 
     
    “Mere narration for such productions may be boring. Thus I think we should add dramatic effects to the work to make it more interesting,” she stated.
     
    She said that Charles Dickens’ “Oliver Twist” is highly appropriate to be made into an audio book.
     
    Several Persian translations of “Daddy-Long-Legs” have previously been published in Iran. However, Navidan was commissioned to provide a new translation of the work.
     
    “Since my childhood, I was interested in the novel and in other words I have lived with this book,” Navidan said.
     
    “I have always asked myself, years after its authorship, why has ‘Daddy-Long-Legs’ still kept its freshness and is not boring even when read again and again,” she added.
     
    “I think the main reason is the hope the story offers. The hope for progress and a better tomorrow makes the story more attractive,” she stated.
     
    “Daddy-Long-Legs” was Webster’s best-known work. Webster herself adapted it into a stage play which debuted in 1914.
     
    MMS/YAW
    END

    0 0

    TEHRAN – A Persian translation of “Dying” by the Austrian author and dramatist Arthur Schnitzler will be published in Tehran in the near future.
     
    Ali-Asghar Haddad translated the book into Persian which was released by Mahi Publications.
     
    The book contains 20 short stories on the theme of death. 
     
    SB/YAW
    END 
     

    0 0

    TEHRAN – Iranian musician and tar virtuoso Keyvan Saket will give a benefit concert for child workers at the Faculty of Art & Architecture of Tehran’s Islamic Azad University from February 22 to 26.
     
    The classic guitarist Farzin Tehranian will accompany Saket during the concert, which are organized by the Association for the Protection of Child Laborers (Kook).
     
    The event is a part of a five-day festival during which confectionaries and handicrafts will be sold to raise funds for child laborers.
     
    SB/YAW
    END 

    0 0

    TEHRAN -- The Persian literary monthly Bokhara commemorated Iranian author and translator of Italian literature Reza Qeisarieh during a ceremony in Tehran on Thursday.
     
    The Italian ambassador to Tehran Luca Giansanti, Italian Cultural Attaché Carlo Cereti, Bokhara Managing Director Ali Dehbashi, and a number of Iranian literary figures including Antonia Shoraka, Manuchehr Sadat Afsari, and Nadia Moaveni attended the ceremony, the Persian service of IRNA reported on Friday.
     
    Speaking in the ceremony, Ambassador Luca Giansanti pointed to the significant role of translation in transferring cultures.
     
    One of the major duties of those who work as representatives in other countries is to get to know and honor those who make efforts to act as a bridge between the nations with their works, Luca Giansanti said.
     
    He added that Qeisarieh was one of the figures who was able to translate into Persian works by great Italian authors, works which played major roles in introducing Italian literature to the Iranian nation.
     
    Dehbashi and several other literary figures also gave brief speeches about the works and character of Qeisarieh, and his role in introducing the culture and literature of Italy to Iran.
     
    Born in 1940 in Tehran, Qeisarieh studied political science in Italy, and has been teaching Italian language and literature at the University of Tehran.
     
    He later established the Italian translation department at the Azad University in 1981 and began to teach Italian language and literature there.
     
    He has been active as translator of works by Italian writers into Persian such as works by Alberto Moravia, Dino Buzzati, Fernanda Pivano and Italo Calvino.
     
    Qeisarieh has also penned several books in Persian including “Naderi Café”, “Seven Stories” and “Praising Age 77”.
     
    RM/YAW
    END

    0 0

    TEHRAN -- Winners of the 29th Fajr International Music Festival were announced during a ceremony at Tehran’s Vahdat Hall on Thursday evening.

     
    First prize in the Western classical music category was shared by Hadi Rahmani for “A Suite for Orchestra” and Erfan Vakili for “Gonad-e Aflak”, organizers announced on Friday.
     
    In the classical music category, the first prize was shared by Kurosh Matin for “Dawn”, and Mojtaba Habibi for “Intimates”.
     
    The second award in the western classical group category went to Rasa Chamber Orchestra led by Ramyar Behzadi. No group was deemed deserving of first prize in this category.
     
    In the Iranian classical group category, the first prize went to the Sereshk Group led by Yahya Alavi, the second prize went to the Shamsa Group led by Nima Bathaii, and the third prize was given to the Rabie Group led by Mohammad-Javad Sanei.
     
    The first prize of the choral music section was awarded to the Sonat Choral Group led by Mohsen Bafandeh, the second prize was given to Samat Choral Group led by Azadeh Azimi, and the third prize was shared by Ararat Choral Group led by Arak Khachaturian and Khorasan Razavi Music Association’s Choral Group.
     
    In addition, Keivan Ataii was honored for “Tahamtan” in the Epic composition section.
     
    The 29th Fajr International Music Festival was held in Tehran from February 13 to 20.
     
    The organizers also honored the Santur virtuoso Ardavan Kamkar and pianist Farimah Qavam-Sadri with lifetime achievement awards at the closing ceremony of the festival.
     
    RM/YAW
    END

    0 0

    TEHRAN -- The Iranian Ministry of Culture and Islamic Guidance has agreed to modify “Hussein, Who Said No” after protests by two clerics on the depiction of the depiction of members of Shia imams’ households in the film, which is about the tragedy of Ashura.

     
    “The viewpoints of the ulama about ‘Hussein, Who Said No’ will be taken into consideration,” Iran Cinema Organization Director Hojjatollah Ayyubi said during a meeting with Ayatollah Nasser Makarem Shirazi in Qom on Thursday.
     
    The depiction of Prophet Muhammad (S) and his household (AS) in any art production are not allowed.    
     
    Ayatollah Makarem Shirazi sent a letter to Ayyubi last week protesting the depiction of members of Shia saints in the film, which premiered at the 32nd Fajr International Film Festival held In Tehran from February 1 to 11.  
     
    The faces of Hazrat Abbas (AS), the brother of Imam Hussein (AS); Hazrat Ali-Akbar (AS) and Hazrat Ali-Asghar (AS), the sons of Imam Hussein (AS); and Hazrat Qasim (AS), the son of Imam Hassan (AS) have been depicted graphically in scenes of the film directed by Ahmadreza Darvish.
     
    Culture Minister Ali Jannati previously said that the scenes will be modified for public premiere of the film by use of computerized special effects. The ICO is affiliated with the culture ministry.
     
    Darvish along with a large number of international professionals spent about ten years making the blockbuster, which was sponsored by a number of major governmental organizations.
     
    Ayatollah Lotfollah Safi Golpayegani also raised an objection over the film last week. 
     
    “Hussein, Who Said No” won five Crystal Simorghs in the categories of best film, best director, best composer, best cinematographer, and best costume and set designer at the Fajr film festival.
     
    MMS/YAW
    END

older | 1 | .... | 83 | 84 | (Page 85) | 86 | 87 | .... | 174 | newer