Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Showcase


Channel Catalog


Channel Description:

Tehran Times - Iran's Leading International Daily

older | 1 | .... | 61 | 62 | (Page 63) | 64 | 65 | .... | 174 | newer

    0 0

    TEHRAN – A Persian translation of “Cat Number 3” by British children’s writer Alison Prince has been published in Iran.

     
    Atusa Salehi translated the book, which was released by Peydayesh Publications. 
     
    Illustrated by Doffy Weir, “Cat Number 3” tells the story of Ernie who loves music and loves his cats. He always counts his cats at dinner time. There is Bert and Whistle, one and two. Then, suddenly one day, they become three!
     
    Sly black cat Jezebel has snuck in and somehow got a share of Bert and Whistle’s food, their home and Ernie’s attention. 
     
    Alison Prince is an established author of children’s books and was joint-winner of the Guardian Prize in 1996, sharing it with author Philip Pullman. 
     
    The book has been published as the eighth volume in the ten-volume series “Stories for Schoolgirls” published by Peydayesh Publications.
     
    “Pa’s Perfect Pizza” and “Pa’s Poopy Chair” by Niki Daly, “The Wedding Present” by Adele Geras and “Matty Mouse” by Jenny Nimmo are some of the books that have been translated and published for the collection.
     
    SB/YAW
    END

    0 0

    TEHRAN – Six Iranian films will go on screen at the Yari Film Festival, which will be held on September 28 and 29 in Uppsala, Sweden.
     
    Among the films are “The Last Step” directed by Ali Mosaffa, “Facing Mirrors” by Negar Azarbaijani, and “Hush! Girls Don’t Scream” by Puran derakhshandeh.
     
    In addition, “The Wooden Bridge” by Mehdi Karampur, “Meeting Leila” by Adel Yaraqi, and “I am a Mother” by Fereidun Jeirani will be screened.
     
    Iranian stage and screen actress Pantea Bahram will be a guest of honor at the festival.
     
    The annual film festival is organized by Yari, a charity organization that helps street children go to school by collecting money to build schools and libraries for these children in Iran.
     
    Every year, several Iranian actors and actresses are invited to the festival, in which a number of Iranian features and short films are screened.
     
    SB/YAW
    END

    0 0

    TEHRAN – A collection of posters by prominent Polish graphic designer Piotr Kunce, head of the Poster Design Studio at the Graphic Faculty of the Academy of Fine Arts in Krakow, is scheduled to go on display in an exhibition, which will open at the Imam Ali (AS) Religious Arts Museum in Tehran on September 13.
     
    Seventy posters centering on cultural and social issues will be showcased at the exhibit, which has jointly been organized by the museum and the Embassy of Poland, the managing director of the museum, Amir Abdolhossein, said in a press release on Sunday.
     
    A workshop has also been arranged on the sidelines to provide an opportunity for the youth to become familiar with Kunce’s technique for creating his posters, he added.
     
    Born on February 6th, 1947 in Krakow, Kunce is working as a full professor at the Academy of Fine Arts in Krakow. He is also the organizer of a poster festival in his home city.
     
    Besides poster designing, he is a specialist in visual identification design. In this field he has many significant achievements. He is also member and vice president of the Society of Graphic Designers in Poland.
     
    So far, Kunce has held about 20 solo exhibits in world museums and galleries.
     
    RM/YAW
    END

    0 0

    TEHRAN -- Omani Minister of Information Abdul Munim bin Mansoor al Hassani arrived in Tehran on Saturday at the head of a cultural delegation. 
     
    He met Iranian Minister of Culture and Islamic Guidance Ali Jannati and they discussed the expansion of cultural relations during the meeting, the Persian service of IRNA has reported.
     
    Holding talks with several Iranian officials as well as visiting the Iran National Library and Archives, and several historical sites across capital Tehran are among other programs arranged during the three-day visit of the Omani delegation.
     
    RM/YAW
    END

    0 0

    TEHRAN -- After a seven-year hiatus, Kiumars Purahmad is back with “The Last 50 Steps”, a drama on the Iran-Iraq 1980-1988 war.
     
    The film is based on a story by Iranian war writer Habib Ahmadzadeh, the film’s producer, the Society of the Revolution and Sacred Defense Cinema, announced in press release on Sunday.
     
    It is about an intelligence officer of the Najaf Ashraf Armored Division, one of the Iranian military groups which carried out Operation Wa al-Fajr 4 during October and November 1983.
     
    This is Purahmad’s second film revolving around the Iran-Iraq war, which is known as the Sacred Defense in Iran. He made “Night But” in 2006 about an Iranian teenage combatant and a middle-aged soldier who are tasked to relocate a group of Iraqi prisoners of war by bus behind the front.
     
    The film won the Jury Grand Prize at the Asia Pacific Screen Awards in 2007.
     
    Purahmad is mostly known for his TV series “The Majid Stories” (1990) based on a book of the same name written by prominent children’s author Hushang Moradi Kermani.
     
    MMS/YAW
    END

    0 0

    TEHRAN -- The Iranian movie “Fish and Cat” won the Special Orizzonti Award for Innovative Content at the 70th Venice International Film Festival.

     
    The film’s director Shahram Mokri received the award during the festival’s closing ceremony, which was held at the Palazzo del Casino in Venice on September 7.
     
    “Fish and Cat” narrates the story of a group of university students who face different problems during their trip to the northern part of Iran.
     
    The Orizzonti or Horizons strand section of the festival is dedicated to new trends in filmmaking, screening a selection of short films that last a maximum of 20 minutes. 
     
    The Orizzonti Jury of the 70th Venice Film Festival chaired by Paul Schrader was composed of Catherine Corsini, Leonardo Di Costanzo, Golshifteh Farahani, Frédéric Fonteyne, Kseniya Rappoport and Amr Waked.
     
    The Golden Lion for Best Film of the festival went to “Sacro Gra”, an Italian-French production directed by Gianfranco Rosi.
     
    Alexandros Avranas from Greece received the Silver Lion for Best Director for “Miss Violence” and the Grand Jury Prize went to “Jiaoyou” by Tsai Ming-liang (Chinese Taipei, France).
     
    SB/YAW
    END

    0 0

    TEHRAN -- Iranian films “The Sound of My Foot” and “Dream of Cinema” will go on screen at the 12th China International Children’s Film Festival, which will be held from September 10 to 14 in Siping, China.
     
    Directed by Mehrdad Khoshbakht, “The Sound of My Foot” narrates the story of a 12-year-old runner who loses one of his legs in a mine explosion.
     
    “Dream of Cinema” directed by Hamid and Ali Shah-Hatami is about a boy named Kazem whose zest for cinema creates problems for him.
     
    Forty Chinese and foreign children’s films and animations will compete in the festival. 
     
    SB/YAW
    END

    0 0

    TEHRAN -- The Iranian movie “3 Minutes Script” directed by Narges Kharqani will go on screen at the 4th Annual Big-Little Comedy Fest in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S.
     
    Shima Sharifi, Arian Azari, Ali Sharifi and Ghazal Ghaffari star in the film.
     
    The festival, which will be held from September 26 to 29, features Shorts Competition - showing video sketch, short films, and pilots in addition to live performances.
     
    SB/YAW
    END

    0 0

    TEHRAN – All box office receipts from the world premiere of “The Fourth Child”, a production of Iran’s Farabi Cinema Foundation about the famine and war in Somalia, will be donated to Somali children, announced foundation managing director Ahmad Mir-Alaii at a screening of the film at Tehran’s Farhang Cinema on Sunday.   
     
    Diplomats from the embassies of Brazil, Bangladesh and Greece, as well as director Vahid Musaian attended the film screening session.
     
    Mir-Alaii also expressed hope that the movie will draw the world’s attention to peace and children’s rights.
     
    He considered Musaian a committed filmmaker, and expressed his gratitude to the film cast and crew for the efforts they made and the dangers they encountered while shooting the film in Africa.
     
    Musaian also hoped that the film would have positive impact for the children in the world.
     
    “The Fourth Child” is about an Iranian nurse who leaves her country to help people in the famine and war-torn country. However, she begins a career in photography to raise awareness about the human disaster.
     
    Mahtab Keramati, Mehdi Hashemi and Hamed Behdad are the main members of the cast. 
     
    The film has been on screen in Tehran and several other cities since early August.
     
    RM/YAW
    END

    0 0

    TEHRAN – Veteran photographer Afshin Bakhtiar, famous for his photos of nature, monuments and ancient sites in Iran, plans to publish his latest series on Iranian sites registered on UNESCO’s World Heritage List in a book in the near future.
     
    Entitled “Iran, the World Heritage”, the book will contain about 800 photos, Bakhtiar told the Persian service of IRNA. 
     
    A part of the book will be dedicated to images of Iranian monuments submitted for registration on UNESCO’s World Heritage List. 
     
    The photos highlighting the architecture and beauty of the monuments were taken over the past two years, he added.
     
    So far, 16 Iranian sites including Persepolis and Pasargadae, Soltanieh Dome, and Bam Citadel have been registered on UNESCO’s World Heritage List
     
    Bakhtiar has been active as a photographer for over 45 years.
     
    He has held several exhibits in Iran and other countries such as Britain, Canada, Australia and Sweden.
     
    RM/YAW
    END

    0 0

    TEHRAN -- A restoration plan for the Tabriz Bazaar in the northwestern Iranian city of Tabriz has won one of the five Aga Khan Awards for Architecture, organizers have announced.

     
    The Islamic Cemetery in the Austrian town of Altach, the Rabat-Salé Urban Infrastructure Project in Rabat, Morocco, the Revitalization of Birzeit Historic Centre in Palestine, and the Salam Cardiac Surgery Centre in Khartoum, Sudan were other winners, which were honored at the Castle of São Jorge in Lisbon last Friday.
     
    The award was established by international business magnate Aga Khan IV in 1977 to honor architectural concepts that successfully address the needs and aspirations of Islamic societies in the fields of contemporary design, social housing, community development and improvement, restoration, reuse and area conservation, as well as landscape design and improvement of the environment.
     
    The award presentation ceremony is organized every three years each time in a different country by the Aga Khan Trust for Culture, an agency of the Aga Khan Development Network.
     
    The $1 million prize is divided among the architects. Given every three years, the Award focuses on the revitalization of historic sites, social centers, and infrastructure.
     
    The Tabriz Bazaar, one of the main trade centers on the Silk Road, was registered on the UNESCO World Heritage List in August 2010.
     
    The history of the bazaar embodies a perfect traditional system of medieval Iranian Islamic trade.
     
    The Tabriz Bazaar flourished during the 13th century and retained its commercial and administrative status until 1548 when Safavid king Shah Tahmasp I moved his capital to Qazvin.
     
    The bazaar comprises 23 caravanserais, 22 corridors, 20 malls, 28 mosques, 8 madrasahs, 5 bathhouses, 2 icehouses, and a zurkhaneh – a traditional Iranian sports club.
     
    The bazaar has been covered with vaults built with bricks.
     
    MMS/YAW
    END

    0 0

    TEHRAN -- A documentary about the campaigns during Iran’s presidential election on June 14, 2013, which led to the victory of the moderate candidate, Hassan Rohani, premiered at the cinematheque of the Iranian Artists Forum in Tehran on Monday evening.
     
    A number critics, cineastes, scholars and officials attended the screening of “The End of Pasteur Street” which was jointly directed by Jafar Mohammadi and Mohsen Khanjahani in the heat of the election campaigns.
     
    In addition, the documentary was reviewed by a panel of critics and experts after the screening.
     
    “To me, some parts of the documentary that pursued the debates and the issues on the election were boring,” said Sadeq Zibakalam, a professor of politics at the University of Tehran.
     
    “The film also does not show how the people who had boycotted the election suddenly changed their minds and rushed to vote,” he added.
     
    “There are significant answers this question… as a professor politics, I think the avalanche of people on election day resulted from those who had changed their minds a few days before the election,” he noted.  
     
    He said that Rohani’s main rival, Mohammad-Baqer Qalibaf would have won if they had refused to vote.
     
    However, he noted that many people including students, scholars and experts on social and political issues would be interested in the documentary in the future “because the story of the film is about the 2013 election, which was very important,” Zibakalam stated.
     
    Analysts have said that the serious clash between Rohani and Qalibaf during the last televised debate played a key role in the victory of Rohani in the election.
     
    MMS/YAW
    END

    0 0

    TEHRAN -- Omani Minister of Information Abdul Munim bin Mansoor al Hassani and Iranian Minister of Culture and Islamic Guidance Ali Jannati signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) here on Monday.
     
    The MOU was inked during a meeting, in which both sides agreed to dispatch art and cultural troupes to different festivals of both countries.
     
    They also emphasized on collaboration between the Islamic Republic of Iran News Agency (IRNA) and the Oman News Agency (ONA).
     
    Active participation of journalists in press conferences as well as distribution of Iranian Arab-language dailies in Oman was also discussed at the session.
     
    Holding joint exhibits of photos, visual arts, calligraphy and paintings in Tehran and Muscat were also reviewed.
     
    In addition, they both announced their readiness to screen Iranian films and air Iranian TV series on Omani TV channels along with holding film weeks in both countries.
     
    The Omani minister visited Islamic Republic of Iran Broadcasting (IRIB) Director Ezzatollah Zarghami and Islamic Culture and Relations Organization (ICRO) Director Mohammad-Baqer Khorramshad during his three-day visit to Tehran as head of a cultural delegation.
     
    RM/YAW
    END

    0 0

    TEHRAN -- An Iranian company has produced an animated series animation entitled “The International Soldiers”, which satirizes the United States government’s definition of terrorism.

     
    Abbas Askari has directed the ten-episode series, which has been produced by Farasuye Ab’aad Company in the southern Iranian city of Kerman.
     
    A group of ten animators has worked on the production, which is scheduled to be unveiled during a ceremony in the near future.
     
    SB/YAW
    END

    0 0

    TEHRAN -- Hossein Entezami, the former editor-in-chief of Persian dailies of Hamshahri and Jam-e Jam, has been appointed the deputy culture minister for press affairs.

     
    The appointment was announced in a press release on Tuesday by the Ministry of Culture and Islamic Guidance.
     
    Over the past few years, Entezami was also the representative of the managing directors of Iranian newspapers in the culture ministry’s Committee for Supervising Press.
     
    The position was previously held by Mohammad-Jafar Mohammadzadeh.
     
    SB/YAW
    END

    0 0

    TEHRAN -- The celebrated Iranian vocalist Homayun Shajarian will be giving concerts in Tehran’s Milad Tower on September 12, 13, 14 and 19.

     
    Conductor Bardia Kiaras along with the Tehran Chamber Orchestra, an orchestra comprised of young musicians established last year, will accompany Shajarian in his performances, Director of Qoqnus Music Institute, Mohammad-Hossein Tutunchian has said in a press release early this week.
     
    Shajarian is due to perform several compositions selected from his albums “With the Stars” and “Breeze of Union” including the song “Feeling of Crying”.
     
    “I am sure many fans are waiting to see Shajarian giving performances live in concert,” Tutunchian said.
     
    “We are trying to introduce good music to the society and help promote a culture of thinking in the society we are living in,” he said.
     
    During the rehearsal a few days before the concerts, Shajarian said that the Tehran Chamber Orchestra has good, capable musicians and expressed his happiness to be collaborating with Kiaras.
     
    Member of the orchestra Ali Jafari Puyan said that the orchestra has plans to give several performances of Iranian and Western classics in the future.
     
    RM/YAW
    END

    0 0

    SEOUL -- I arrived at Incheon International Airport on August 15. It was 4:25 p.m. local time. The interpreter, Kwak Saera, was waiting for me at the airport holding a placard with my name written on it in English.

     
    I started talking in English, but Saera told me to speak in Persian. She said she received a Ph.D. in linguistics from the University of Tehran. She was a fluent English speaker but she preferred to speak Persian. She said her name is similar to the Persian name Sara, a name which frequently appears in elementary school textbooks in Iran.
     
    Saera said on that day (August 15), the streets were not busy because it was a public holiday, commemorating the day that Korea was liberated from Japanese colonialism in 1945, which in the Korean language is called Gwangbokjeol, meaning Liberation Day. National flags were flying in the city in celebration.
     
    We travelled from Incheon airport to Seoul in an Opirus car and finally arrived at the Plaza Hotel, opposite City Hall. After I took a short rest at the hotel, Saera took me to Seoul Tower. We boarded an electric-powered bus full of passengers and travelled to the tower, which is located on Namsan Mountain in central Seoul.
     
    Before my visit to the Republic of Korea (ROK), I had expressed interest in the development of green technology in the country, and I was thus happy to board an electric-powered bus. As the bus was driving up, we could see people, including some foreign tourists, walking up Namsan Mountain to reach the tower.
     
    When the bus reached its last station, we walked dozens of meters to reach the tower, and Saera stood in a long line to get tickets to the top of the tower. Before taking a full tour of the tower, we had a dinner, tasting Korean food and simultaneously enjoying the scenery by looking at the metropolis of Seoul from atop the tower. Everything there was exciting.
     
    The visitors, mostly Korean youths, were taking pictures of the tower and of the city from the top of the tower. 
     
    Jongmyo: A Confucian shrine 
     
    On the morning of August 16, first we visited Jongmyo Shrine, which was close to our hotel. The guide, a lady quite fluent in English who has degrees in history and political science, gave explanations about the philosophy behind the establishment of the shrine.
     
    The shrine, founded during the Joseon dynasty (1392–1910), is where the ancestral tablets of deceased kings and queens are enshrined and sacrificial rites are performed for them. 
     
    As we were visiting the shrine, which is surrounded by a forest, the songs of birds reverberated through the air.
     
    Jongmyo was built because according to Confucian philosophy, the spirit separates from the body upon death, and the spirit goes to heaven while the body returns to Earth. For this reason, Koreans built tombs and shrines separately. They kept spirit tablets to house the spirit of the deceased and made offerings to these tablets to worship their ancestors.
     
    The shrine, the oldest and most authentic of the Confucian royal shrines, is situated on the ridge of Eungbongsan Mountain, near the Changdeokgung and Changgyeonggung palaces.   
     
    Jongmyo was built in 1395 after King Taejo, the founder of the Joseon dynasty, selected Hanyang (present-day Seoul) as the capital of his kingdom. About 200 years after the construction of the shrine, it was burned down by Japanese invaders in 1592. The current shrine dates to 1608. With the passage of time, the facilities were enlarged as more kings and queens were enshrined.
     
    The most important buildings at Jongmyo are Jeongjeon and Yeongnyeongjeon. At present, Jeongjeon contains 19 chambers housing 49 spirit tablets of kings and queens, including Taejo. Yeongnyeongjeon contains 16 chambers housing 34 tablets. 
     
    Among all the Confucian states in Asia where similar shrines were constructed, only Korea has preserved its royal shrine and continues to perform royal ancestral rites and ritual music, known as Jongmyo Jerye and Jongmyo Jeryeak. That is the main reason that Jongmyo was added to the UNESCO World Heritage List in 1995 and Jongmyo Jerye (royal ancestral rites) and Jongmyo Jeryeak (royal ancestral ritual music) were designated by UNESCO as Masterpieces of the Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity in 2001. 
     
    The walkways stretching from the main gate to inside the shrine are covered with rough stones. This forced the ritual attendants, including the king, to walk slowly, as is appropriate for a solemn occasion. And none of the structures at Jongmyo are lavishly adorned, highlighting the shrine’s solemnity.
     
    Lunch at a traditional restaurant 
     
    After visiting Jongmyo Shrine, we headed to Insa-dong Street, where shops sell traditional Korean clothes and other items.
     
    Stores on Insa-dong Street specialize in a wide variety of goods, such as hanbok (traditional clothing), hanji (traditional paper), traditional teas, pottery, and handicrafts.
     
    The neighborhood is a fascinating place for tourists, who buy Korean souvenirs there. 
     
    Saera said this area is popular with Chinese and Japanese tourists and some shopkeepers can speak Chinese and Japanese. 
     
    In former times, noble families lived in this area because it is near Kyungbok Palace, she added.
     
    After touring Insa-dong Street, we drank Korean green tea and then left for a lunch at a traditional restaurant.
     
    The restaurant was a traditional house with a few rooms on each side and a yard in the middle. We were led to a small room for lunch. As we were entering the room, a group of Western-looking tourists were guided to another room for lunch.
     
    We were served a number of Korean foods whose names I did not know, except for kimchi. Saera then described the nature of the various dishes to me. 
     
    Visiting the Mapo Resource Recovery Plant
     
    Afterwards, we headed toward the Mapo Resource Recovery Plant, where 650 tons of waste is recycled per day. Kim Dong Sik, the site manager, provided explanations about the process of recycling. 
     
    The plant, built in 2005 on a landfill, provides heating for 20,000 homes in the Mapo area of Seoul and clearly highlights the important steps the country has taken in the development of green technology and the protection of the environment.
     
    Later, we visited the campus of Hongik University, a university in the Mapo-gu district of central Seoul best known for its faculty of fine arts, and the surrounding streets, which are mostly frequented by Korean youths. 
     
    Enjoying the beautiful scenery of the Han River
     
    As we were walking the streets, I told Saera that I would like to see the Han River. We got in the Opirus and travelled to the Han River, which passes through the heart of Seoul. There I saw some people jet skiing and some Western-looking men and women who were windsurfing.
     
    As we walked along the river bank, some people were biking. There is a special lane along the river for bicyclists. Some people were also running along the river bank and others were pedaling duck boats. Ferry boats were sailing on the river, too. 
     
    The Han River offers jet skiing, water skiing and powerboat, motorboat, and duck boat rides. 
     
    The Han River provides golden opportunities for sports enthusiasts and people seeking peace of mind.
     
    Unfortunately, we only had a little time to walk along the river and enjoy the scenery.  
     
    The beautiful scenery along the river, combined with its skillfully designed bridges and the nearby modern residential towers, leave an unforgettable impression in the minds of foreign visitors, especially people from arid or semi-arid regions with few rivers.
     
    Every time our car passed along the river or crossed over it, I took long looks at the river, wishing I had time to walk for hours along its banks and enjoy the beautiful scenery.  
     
    Visit to Palgakjeong on Bugaksan Mountain 
     
    After visiting the Han River, our driver, Hong Kyung-jun, who spoke English fluently, headed toward Palgakjeong, an octagonal pavilion on Bugaksan Mountain in north Seoul with a fantastic view that makes you feel like Seoul is at your feet.
     
    The forested mountain road to Palgakjeong gives visitors a sense of calm and tranquility. Palgakjeong offers tourists lovely views of Seoul and its surrounding mountains. 
     
    Saera said people visit Palgakjeong for entertainment, with many playing music or reciting poetry. 
     
    When one looks at north Seoul from Palgakjeong, one sees high-rise apartments surrounded by forests. The scenery gives one the impression that it is a mountain resort and not north Seoul.
     
    After visiting Palgakjeong, we drove near the Blue House, the presidential palace which is constructed in the form of a traditional Korean hanok. Nearby we saw some police officers on guard. 
     
    The Odusan Unification Observatory 
     
    On the morning of August 17, we went to the Odusan Unification Observatory north of Seoul, where Koreans and foreigners visit to get a glimpse of the area. It is a perfect spot to witness the division of the Korean Peninsula in person. 
     
    It took us about one hour to drive from Seoul to the top of the hill, where the observatory is located. We looked through telescopes to see North Korea on the other side of the Imjin River, which divides North and South Korea. 
     
    The observatory overlooks the confluence of the Imjin and Han rivers. Between the observatory and North Korea there is a two-kilometer stretch of water. 
     
    On the border, the Imjin River is two kilometers from bank to bank at its widest point and less than 500 meters at its narrowest.
     
    There are rooms where a film that provides some information about Odusan itself and North Korea is screened. You can watch either the English or the Korean language version of the film.   
     
    There are many exhibits and pictures explaining the 1950-1953 Korean War and other significant historical events. 
     
    The philosophy behind the construction of the observatory is to remind the younger generation about the tragic reality of the divided Korean Peninsula, which I personally like to call the “divided family”. 
     
    It seems that most of the people who visit Odusan, both Koreans and foreigners, pray for the unification of the two Koreas. There is a Unification Wishing Room in the observatory where visitors can write down their wishes for unification on pieces of paper. These notes will be stored in a time capsule until the day when the two Koreas are unified. 
     
    Now that I have returned to Iran, I really regret the fact that I forgot to write a note expressing may heartfelt wishes for a unification of the “divided family”.
     
    I felt sad when Saera told me that her grandmother had been left behind in North Korea when the peninsula was divided and now she does not know whether she is alive or dead.
     
    While we were visiting the observatory, we saw an exhibition displaying the goods produced at the Kaesong industrial complex in North Korea, a facility built by South Korea as a sign of goodwill to bury enmities and take steps toward unification.
     
    The observatory also has a museum showing everyday items from North Korea, such as clothes worn by average citizens. It even has a model of a North Korean elementary school classroom.
     
    The Unification Exhibition Hall also has exhibits on the division of the peninsula, as well as the conflicts, dialogue, and cooperative interactions between the two Koreas.
     
    Outside the observatory, there is a sculpture symbolizing peace, a unification wishing drum, and a worship alter. 
     
    After touring the observatory, we drove down the hill and then ate lunch at a traditional Korean restaurant, where we sat on the floor. After that, we drove back to Seoul for our next stop.
     

    The National Museum of Korean Contemporary History 
     
    The National Museum of Korean Contemporary History in Seoul depicts the history of Korea in the political, economic, social, and cultural spheres stage by stage, starting from 1876, when the nation opened its ports to the outside world.
     
    The museum informs visitors about both bitter episodes, such as the Japanese colonization of Korea, the division of the Korean Peninsula, and the 1950-1953 Korean War and the amazing economic and industrial progress made by the Republic of Korea (South Korea) in just sixty years.
     
    In other words, the museum demonstrates how the Republic of Korea has transformed itself from one of the poorest nations in the world to one of the most technologically advanced countries. 
      
    In addition, it shows the country’s struggle to establish civil society and democracy.
     
    The museum documents various educational programs established to help South Koreans understand the recent history of their country. In fact, it promotes the national will and vision for the Korean people and future generations.
     
    The museum familiarizes kindergarteners and elementary, middle, and high school students, as well as adults, with contemporary Korean history.
     
    For example, the Discovery Center is meant to help children experience, discover, and understand the country’s modern history.
     
    We also saw groups of schoolchildren touring the museum, with guides and instructors giving them explanations about the exhibits.
     
    The Prelude to the Republic of Korea (1876-1945) section begins with the year 1876, when the Joseon dynasty officially ended the seclusion policy and moves on to the Japanese colonization of Korea and the 1945 national liberation movement.
     
    The Founding of the Republic of Korea (1945-1960) section tells the story of the establishment of the Republic of Korea, the devastating Korean War, the efforts made to achieve the post-war recovery, and the laying of the foundations of national development. The section also has photos depicting the April 19 Revolution of 1960, in which students and other citizens fought to restore democracy in the Republic of Korea.
       
    The Development of the Republic of Korea (1961-1987) section has exhibits displaying the country’s economic development and rapid industrialization as well as the transformation of urban and rural areas and the promotion of civil society. 
     
    What attracted my attention the most was the exhibit showing a 1982 model of the first truly South Korean car, the Hyundai Pony, which hit showrooms in 1975. The docent said models, with steering wheels on the right, were later exported to New Zealand, which was a turning point in the industrialization of South Korea.
     
    And finally, the Modernization and Korea’s Vision of the Future (1988 to the present) section shows South Korea’s embrace of globalization and emergence as a developed nation. It tells the tale of how the country managed to rise from the ashes of the 1950-1953 war and establish an advanced economy in less than half a century, becoming a global player in the sporting, cultural, and economic spheres in the process.     
        
    Jeonju Hanok Village 
     
    On August 18, at 7:40 a.m. local time, we left the Plaza Hotel and drove to the Seoul Express Terminal, where we took a bus to Jeonju, a tourist city that is famous for its traditional hanok houses. On the way to the terminal, we passed through a long tunnel and a small tunnel and then crossed over the Han River to reach the terminal. 
     
    Saera bought tickets, and after we waited for some time at the terminal, the bus started moving. It took us about three and a half hours to reach Jeonju.
     
    On the road, some passengers slept or amused themselves with their tablets or laptops, but I could not miss a moment of the beautiful views of forested mountains, paddy fields, high-rise buildings, rivers, bridges, and villages.  
      
    During this trip, I realized that it is not just Seoul that is developed, but in reality the whole country is harmoniously developed or is on the road to progress.
       
    After we reached Jeonju, we ate lunch and took a brief rest until a car came and took us to Samnye Art Village. The complex was originally a group of rice warehouses built in 1920, but in 2010 it was converted into an art center. Some of the buildings look modern and some still look like warehouses. 
     
    The art village has seven buildings -- an information center, a book museum, a book art center, an art gallery, a design museum, a wood works center, and a culture cafe. 
     
    The Samnye Art Village is actually an education center. 
     
    Old printing presses are also on exhibit. 
     
    One of the things that really caught my attention was an artistic work which shows that the West Sea (the Yellow Sea) is naturally calm and quiet but has become restless due to the tension between North and South Korea. 
     
    Another very interesting artistic work was a video of a penguin anxiously watching the ice melting in the Antarctic, while the people in cities, especially big cities, are recklessly producing more and more greenhouse gas emissions, apparently with no concern about global warming.   
     
    The art works depicting a restless West Sea and an anxious penguin show that South Koreans want friendly ties with North Korea and are trying to promote an environmentally friendly lifestyle.
     
    In the area of the art village, some South Koreans and some foreigners were creating pottery works. In addition, a Korean woman, dressed in traditional attire, was making traditional juice.  
     
    After touring the Samnye Art Village, we boarded the car and headed toward the Jeonju Hanok Village in the center of the city, where houses are built with wooden frames.
     
    On the stone-paved main streets, where the hanok houses are located, cars are a rare sight, and this allows people, and especially tourists, to observe the artfully constructed hanok houses in a calm and relaxed manner. 
     
    There are over 800 hanoks in Jeonju. While the rest of the city has been industrialized, the hanoks retain their traditional charm.
     
    I saw a hanok under construction on a main street. 
     
    The hanoks are now used as traditional tea shops, souvenir shops, museums, guest houses, and restaurants. I, too, bought souvenirs from a shop there. 
     
    I also spent the night in a hanok. It was the first time I ever slept in a traditional Korean house, and it was an experience that I will never forget in my whole life. The hanok was near a forested hill, and the chirping of crickets filled the air.  
     
    In truth, I felt much more comfortable in the hanok than at the Plaza Hotel in Seoul.
     
    At seven in the morning, when we woke up, a lady, who was also the manager of the hanok, provided various traditional foods for breakfast. We ate while sitting on the floor, and the food was very delicious. A bowl of rice, vegetables, meat, red pepper paste, eggs, and other things were placed on the table. I could not resist tasting all the main and side dishes.
     
    While we were waiting for the car to arrive to take us to the city of Daegu, I saw that this lady was constantly working. She never stopped, even for a moment.
     
    The car arrived and we travelled to Daegu. On the road, we stopped at a restaurant for half an hour. After passing through many tunnels, some of them very long, we arrived in Daegu, the third largest city in the Republic of Korea, in two hours. The visit had been arranged so I could see the Daegu Solar Power Tower and the city’s other solar power project. 
     
    My visit to Daegu, which is really a beautiful and modern city, nicely rounded out my trip to South Korea.
     
    PA/HG

    0 0

    TEHRAN -- An Iranian company has produced an animated series animation entitled “The International Soldiers”, which satirizes the United States government’s definition of terrorism.

     
    Abbas Askari has directed the ten-episode series, which has been produced by Farasuye Ab’aad Company in the southern Iranian city of Kerman.
     
    A group of ten animators has worked on the production, which is scheduled to be unveiled during a ceremony in the near future.
     
    SB/YAW
    END

    0 0

    TEHRAN -- Hossein Entezami, the former editor-in-chief of Persian dailies of Hamshahri and Jam-e Jam, has been appointed the deputy culture minister for press affairs.

     
    The appointment was announced in a press release on Tuesday by the Ministry of Culture and Islamic Guidance.
     
    Over the past few years, Entezami was also the representative of the managing directors of Iranian newspapers in the culture ministry’s Committee for Supervising Press.
     
    The position was previously held by Mohammad-Jafar Mohammadzadeh.
     
    SB/YAW
    END

    0 0

    TEHRAN -- The celebrated Iranian vocalist Homayun Shajarian will be giving concerts in Tehran’s Milad Tower on September 12, 13, 14 and 19.

     
    Conductor Bardia Kiaras along with the Tehran Chamber Orchestra, an orchestra comprised of young musicians established last year, will accompany Shajarian in his performances, Director of Qoqnus Music Institute, Mohammad-Hossein Tutunchian has said in a press release early this week.
     
    Shajarian is due to perform several compositions selected from his albums “With the Stars” and “Breeze of Union” including the song “Feeling of Crying”.
     
    “I am sure many fans are waiting to see Shajarian giving performances live in concert,” Tutunchian said.
     
    “We are trying to introduce good music to the society and help promote a culture of thinking in the society we are living in,” he said.
     
    During the rehearsal a few days before the concerts, Shajarian said that the Tehran Chamber Orchestra has good, capable musicians and expressed his happiness to be collaborating with Kiaras.
     
    Member of the orchestra Ali Jafari Puyan said that the orchestra has plans to give several performances of Iranian and Western classics in the future.
     
    RM/YAW
    END

older | 1 | .... | 61 | 62 | (Page 63) | 64 | 65 | .... | 174 | newer